Transcription

Welcometo the Outdoor Journey forCadettes!This document is a step-by-step guide for completing the CadetteOutdoor Journey—it includes detailed meeting outlines and all relatedresources. The Cadette Outdoor Journey consists of three badges:Night Owl, Trailblazing, and Primitive Camper. It also includes a TakeAction project and award. You’ll find that the Cadette Outdoor Journeyis rich and robust because it covers a lot of essential skills that girlsneed in order to be successful in their outdoor pursuits. To completethe Journey, girls will complete these meetings in the following order: Night Owl badge (2 meetings)Trailblazing badge (2 meetings)Primitive Camper badge (2 meetings)Take Action (3 meetings)In the descriptions for each meeting, you will find callouts to “meetingaids.” These meeting aids are grouped together, in the order in whichthey will appear, at the back of this document. The content found inthis package can be downloaded and is identical to what is nowavailable on the Volunteer Toolkit, which means it is written to theintended audience of an adult volunteer. We hope you will findeverything you need to facilitate these programs—and just asimportantly, we hope your Cadette Girl Scouts will find them exciting,challenging, and fun.Questions? Please don’t hesitate to reach out to the Girl Experienceteam at GSUSA at [email protected]

Night Owl 1OVERVIEWNotes to Volunteers:About the Cadette Outdoor Journey:The Cadette Outdoor Journey consists of three badges: Night Owl, Trailblazing, Primitive Camper, and threeTake Action meetings. To complete the Journey, have girls complete the meetings in the following order:Night Owl badge (2 meetings)Trailblazing badge (2 meetings)Primitive Camper badge (2 meetings)Take Action (3 meetings) Night Owl Requirements: There are two meetings for Cadettes to earn their Night Owl Camper badge.Both meetings are designed for nighttime, so make sure to coordinate both meetings for after dark. Themeeting can begin in a meeting room, but plan to take girls outdoors with adult volunteers to explorenighttime activities.Add an Extra Meeting: The meetings are each designed for 90 minutes. It’s perfectly OK to add a meetingto your Outdoor Journey plan if you feel girls need more time completing the badge requirements.Prepare to Take Girls Outside:To earn the Night Owl badge, Cadettes will go outside to study the nighttime sky and go on a nighttimehike. Get support from your council and GSUSA for information about best practices for Girl Scouts inthe outdoors:Check Safety Activity Checkpoints guidelines before planning any outdoor activity.Explore Venture Out! e-out/, an online resource thatprovides guidance to volunteers less familiar with taking girls outdoors.Read the book Outdoor Education in Girl Scouting for helpful tips.Read Explaining Leave No Trace in Meeting Aids: An important part of preparing girls for the outdoorsis to help them understand and embrace the seven basic principles of Leave No Trace. Make the Most of the Outdoor Journey: Use the Talking Points (But Make Them Your Own): In eachsession, you’ll find suggested talking points under the heading “SAY.” Some volunteers, especially new ones,find it helpful to follow the script. Others use the talking points as a guide and deliver the information in theirown words. Either way is just fine.Leave Time for the Closing: If girls are having fun doing an activity, you may be tempted to skip the ClosingCeremony so they can keep going, but the Closing Ceremony is absolutely key to their learning. One ofthe most important components of any activity is allowing time for the girls to reflect on what they have 2017 GSUSA. All right reserved. Not for commercial use. This material is proprietary to GSUSA and may be used, reproduced, distributedexclusively by GSUSA staff, councils, Girl Scout volunteers, service units and/or troops solely in connection with Girl Scouting.

Night Owl 1learned. Research shows that when you use reflection with girls, their learning and enjoyment in activitiesgoes up, so use reflection after activities like a hike or your campout. Ask them about how they felt duringthe activity. What did they learn? How will they use what they have learned? Did any of the activities ignite apassion that could be used for a Take Action project?Use Girl Scouts’ Three Processes: Girl-led, learning by doing, cooperative learning: these three processesare the key to making sure girls have fun in Girl Scouts and keep coming back. Make sure the meetings are“girl led” to help create an experience where girls can make choices and have their voices heard. “Learningby doing” and “cooperative learning” are built into this Journey, thanks to the hands-on activities and tips.Read “Think-Pair-Share” in Meeting Aids: Find out how to make sure all girls are heard when makingteam decisions.Complete the Surveys: Be sure to complete the surveys in the Volunteer Toolkit about your experiences.Your input is important! The data collected is used to enhance the program.If You Have a Multi-Level Troop: Read Tips for Working with Multi-Level Groups for Older Girls inMeeting Aids to get hands-on tips for how to deal with younger girl/older girl scenarios.Prepare AheadRecruit extra volunteers or older girls to accompany you during outdoor nighttime activities.Have enough flashlights or lanterns for each girl.For Activity 1: As Girls Arrive, borrow books about nocturnal animals from a library.Print out Leave No Trace for Older Girls in Meeting Aids, one for each girl, for Activity 2: OpeningCeremonyBorrow astronomy books or constellation guides from the library and ask girls to bring any they mighthave to the meeting for Activity 3: Night Sky Observer.Gather supplies for Activity 4: Make a Galaxy Jar.Get chocolate sandwich cookies for Activity 6: Moon Phase Cookies.Print out Moon Phases in Meeting Aids, one for each girl.Print out Say Goodnight Across the World in Meeting Aids, one for each girl, for Activity 7: ClosingCeremony. Get Help from Your Family and Friends NetworkYour Friends and Family Network can include:Girls’ parents, aunts, uncles, older siblings, etc.Other volunteers who have offered to help with the meeting 2017 GSUSA. All right reserved. Not for commercial use. This material is proprietary to GSUSA and may be used, reproduced, distributedexclusively by GSUSA staff, councils, Girl Scout volunteers, service units and/or troops solely in connection with Girl Scouting.

Night Owl 1Ask your network to help:Bring art supplies and gearBring a camera, smartphone, or video camera to document the meetingAssist with activitiesVolunteer to assist with nighttime activities Award ConnectionCadettes will not earn a badge in this meeting. They will earn their Night Owl badge at the end of Meeting 2.Note: You can buy the Night Owl badge, one for each Cadette, from your council shop or on the Girl Scoutwebsite.Meeting Length90 minutesThe times given for each activity may be different depending on how many Cadettes are in your troop,so adjust accordingly.Give Cadettes 10- and 5-minute warnings before they need to wrap up the last activity so you’ll havetime for the Closing Ceremony.Some activities might require more time, so add an extra meeting if you need to. MATERIALS LISTActivity 1: As Girls Arrive: Local Nocturnal AnimalsPaperPens, pencilsComputer to research or nocturnal animal books borrowed from a library Activity 2: Opening Ceremony: Becoming A Night OwlFlagFlashlights or lanternsPoster board/whiteboardPrint out Leave No Trace for Older Girls in Meeting Aids, one for each girl Activity 3: Night Sky ObserverFlashlights or lanternsNotebook, one for each girl 2017 GSUSA. All right reserved. Not for commercial use. This material is proprietary to GSUSA and may be used, reproduced, distributedexclusively by GSUSA staff, councils, Girl Scout volunteers, service units and/or troops solely in connection with Girl Scouting.

Night Owl 1 Constellation guides or astronomy books with the night sky from the library Pens, markersActivity 4: Make Your Own Galaxy JarClear glass jars with a lidCotton ballsGlitterAcrylic paints in various blues and purplesWooden craft sticks or skewer sticksWater Activity 5: Late Night Talk ShowIndex cards2 chairsSomething that resembles a microphone (could be a hairbrush, toilet paper roll, etc.)Poster board to make signsMarkersVideo camera with tripod (optional) Activity 6: Snack Break: Moon Phase CookiesChocolate sandwich cookiesWooden craft sticksPrintout of Moon Phases in Meeting Aids Activity 7: Closing CeremonyCopies of Say Goodnight Across the World in Meeting Aids, one for each girl DETAILED ACTIVITY PLAN(Note to volunteer: You can begin this meeting in a meeting room, but will have to go outside at night forpart of the activities. If you have access to a zoo, park, or aquarium, you could also start the meeting withthe girls finding examples and facts of nocturnal animals at one of those locations.)Activity 1: As Girls Arrive: Local Nocturnal AnimalsTime Allotment10 minutes 2017 GSUSA. All right reserved. Not for commercial use. This material is proprietary to GSUSA and may be used, reproduced, distributedexclusively by GSUSA staff, councils, Girl Scout volunteers, service units and/or troops solely in connection with Girl Scouting.

Night Owl 1MaterialsPaperPens, pencilsComputer to research or nocturnal animal books borrowed from a library StepsWelcome Cadettes and have them research nocturnal animals that live in their area.SAY:(Note to volunteer: If you have a computer available, have girls do some quick research about nocturnalanimals that live in their area. They can also do research from the library books you bring to the meeting.)Make a list of animals that are nocturnal, or only come out at night. But make sure these are only animalsthat live in your area. It could be an owl, raccoon, deer, rabbit, opossum, coyote, skunk, a house cat, bat, fox,or anything you might see roaming at nighttime or that you find out lives in your area.You can make your list alone or work together as a team.Activity 2: Opening Ceremony: Becoming a Night OwlTime Allotment10 minutesMaterialsFlagFlashlights or lanternsPoster board/whiteboard StepsRecite the Pledge of Allegiance and the Promise and Law.Turn off all the lights, and use flashlights and/or lanterns to create dim lighting.Talk to Cadettes about Leave No Trace and how the world may be different at night. SAY:Most of you try and get things done while it’s light outside—you go to school during the day, do activitiesoutdoors while it’s light out, and begin to wind down as the sun sets.But there’s a whole world that comes alive after dark.For this badge, you’ll find out more about what happens when the stars come out, and how the world looks 2017 GSUSA. All right reserved. Not for commercial use. This material is proprietary to GSUSA and may be used, reproduced, distributedexclusively by GSUSA staff, councils, Girl Scout volunteers, service units and/or troops solely in connection with Girl Scouting.

Night Owl 1after dark.Turn off the lights in the meeting room. Give each girl a flashlight or lantern.SAY:Before you begin, there are a few safety rules for this meeting since you’ll be exploring outside at nighttime.First, if anyone feels scared, please let an adult know immediately.Second, each of you should carry a flashlight when you go outside so you can find your way.Third, always use the buddy system or stick together as a group.And finally, make sure to keep nature safe when you go outdoors.Have girls take turns reading out loud the principles on the Leave No Trace handout.SAY:What are some of the things that you can see or do at night that you can’t do during the day? Who hassomething they like to do at night? (Girls might say: stargaze, enjoy nature, listen to crickets, etc.)As you arrived, you researched nocturnal animals that you may only see or hear at night that live in yourarea. These are nighttime animals you might see or have already seen. Share those.Have girls share the animals they researched and write them on a poster board or white board. Save this listfor Meeting 2.SAY:Are any of these animals endangered or in protected status?What is being done to protect them?(If girls aren’t sure, have them do additional research and report back at the next meeting.)Activity 3: Night Sky ObserverTime Allotment20 minutesMaterialsFlashlights or lanternsNotebook, one for each girlConstellation guides or astronomy books from the libraryPens, markers 2017 GSUSA. All right reserved. Not for commercial use. This material is proprietary to GSUSA and may be used, reproduced, distributedexclusively by GSUSA staff, councils, Girl Scout volunteers, service units and/or troops solely in connection with Girl Scouting.

Night Owl 1StepsGo outside for a short night hike—can be a city or park, but girls should be able to see the stars.Girls try to find north, south, east or west by observing stars in the sky.Have girls write a quick story about a constellation in the nighttime sky. SAY:What do you think explorers thought when they first saw the stars?To help make sense of what they saw, they created names for the stars and groupings of stars.Show girls the different star formations for each hemisphere in a constellation guide before heading outside:North Star - Polaris (Northern Hemisphere)Constellation Orion (can usually see in winter and early spring—to find East and West)Crux, the Southern Cross (South)SAY:First, you’ll use the stars to navigate.Before we had a GPS or compass, navigators used the stars to find their direction. You can find north, south,east or west by learning about a few stars and constellations. See if you can do it when you go outside.The way the earth rotates makes the stars in the sky rotate from east to west. The way a star moves