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Donaghey College ofEngineering & InformationTechnology (EIT)University of Arkansas at Little RockAnnual Reportfor the periodJuly 1, 2009 – June 30, 2010DR. MARY L. GOODDean

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTTABLE OF CONTENTSEIT Organizational Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Executive Summary and Overall Highlights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7EIT External Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14Selected Department Successes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15EIT Selected Student Achievements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16EIT Selected Faculty Achievements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16EIT Curriculum Highlights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17Overall EIT Grant Applications/Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17Overall Public Service Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18Overall Research/Creative Activites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18Overall Personnel Changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19EIT Recruitment and Retention. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20EIT Outreach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23ANNUAL REPORTS BY DEPARTMENTApplied Science Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Computer Science Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47Construction Management Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55Engineering Technology Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65Information Science Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77Systems Engineering Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91Graduate Institute of Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103APPENDIXCollege Advisory Councils. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115Computer Science: Detailed Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123Construction Management: Detailed Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127Information Science: Detailed Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137Systems Engineering: Detailed Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147G E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY3

Graduate Institute ofTechnology:Dr. Keith HudsonSystems Engineering:Dr. Seshadri MohanInformation Science:Dr. Elizabeth PierceEngr. Technology:Dr. Mamdouh BakrConstruction Mgmt:Mr. Mike TramelComputer Science:Dr. Remzi SekerApplied Science:Dr. Haydar Al-ShukriDepartment ChairsStaff: (Michelle Yonkey)Immigration IssuesSecretarial Trainingfor Operational IssuesGrant Budget ReviewsPAF’s and EmployeeFilesBudgetExec. Director of Administrationand Finance: Shawna DiazCollege ation IssuesCollege AssessmentActivitiesSecretaries & TechStaff (EmploymentIssues)Associate DeanDr. Russel BruhnStaff: (Thomas Wallace10 hours per week)External AdvisoryCommittees and BoardsPhilanthropy andAssistance to UniversityDevelopment OfficeCommunity Outreach,including EconomicDevelopment, CollegeOutreach Materials andWebsiteGrants / Contracts tothe College (non-peerreviewed grants andall external contractnegotiations)Government RelationsCorporate RelationsAssistant Dean for ExternalAffairs: Kelley BassRecruitment Coordinator:(Olivia Ross)LR School DistrictOutreachSummer ProgramsData Bases: All StudentContacts, Success Rates, etc.Counselor OutreachGeneral Recruitingand Coordination withUniversity RecruitingWeb-based MathProgram (Outreach andRecruitment)Director of Recruitmentand Outreach:Vernard HenleyStudent ServicesCoordinator:(Jennifer Moody)Databases:Contacts, SuccessRates, Alumni, etc.ArticulationAgreementsAcademic Advising(especially freshmen,transfers and degreecheck-out)Retention, includingStudent Housing,Student Ambassadors,First Year “LearningEnvironment” ActivitiesRecruiting for HighACT ScholarshipStudents (includingASMHS)Asst. Dean for UndergraduatePrograms: Katie YoungAdministrative Assistant to the Dean: Cathy ShankDean of the CollegeDr. Mary L. GoodAs of July 1, 2010Organizational ChartUALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTG E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY5

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTUALR PROVOST’S ANNUAL REPORTJULY 1, 2009 – JUNE 30, 2010EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND OVERALL HIGHLIGHTSThe 2009-2010 fiscal year was truly a watershed time for the Donaghey College of Engineeringand Information Technology (EIT): In November 2009, more than 550 attendees heard former President Bill Clinton deliverthe keynote address at the EIT 10th Anniversary Gala at the Jack Stephens Center, thelargest single fund-raiser in UALR history and a tribute to founding dean Dr. Mary Good. The EIT National Advisory Council for the first time met with full in-person attendance,as nine nationally renowned experts with expertise and experience specifically relevantto EIT’s programs came to Little Rock for an all-day meeting, also in November 2009. In May 2010, faculty in the Computer Science, Information Science and SystemsEngineering moved into the new six-story, 115,000-square-foot, 35 million EIT Building,which officially opens when fall 2010 classes begin August 19. As the fiscal year ended, Dr. Good announced her decision to retire June 30, 2011, and anational search for her replacement commenced.More on the first three of those four major milestones and other highlights in EIT are summarizedin the following sections.EIT ANNIVERSARY GALAA veritable who’s-who of business, civic and academic leaders from across Arkansas andbeyond came to campus Nov. 19, 2009, to pay tribute to Dr. Mary Good and celebrate the 10thanniversary of the Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology, which shehas served as dean since its inception in 1999.More than 550 people – including about 60 members of the EIT faculty and staff – gatheredin the concourse of the Jack Stephens Center for a cocktail reception that included greetingsfrom EIT student ambassadors who served as event hosts and trays of hors d’oeuvres passedby members of the staff of Capers, the local restaurant thatcatered the event.After a seated dinner featuring steak and shrimp, UALRChancellor Joel Anderson introduced President Clinton, whoin his 10-minute talk said, “I think 50 years from now, whenyou look back, you may think that the establishment of theCollege of Engineering and Information Technology – andthe luring of this astonishing woman into this job – may windup being the most significant thing this institution has donesince its creation.”G E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY7

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTExecutive Summary (continued)Former Acxiom CEO Charles Morgan and former Clinton chief of staff and Arkla Gas presidentMack McLarty served as honorary chairs of the EIT 10th anniversary host committee, and eachwas a significant donor to the event. The EIT gala raised more than 200,000 to establish a fundto create an endowed deanship for EIT.Other major sponsors of the event included: Acxiom, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, CoulsonFoundation, Cromwell Architects Engineers, Glazer’s of Arkansas, Nabholz Construction andWeaver-Bailey Contractors, Inc.As part of the 10th anniversary celebration, EIT partnered with Arkansas Times to produce a48-page magazine, appropriately titled “Building Bright Futures,” that chronicled the history ofthe college. It included a profile of Dean Good, features on each of the six programs in thecollege and profiles of seven outstanding EIT students. View the magazine at: http://ualr.edu/eit/magazine/vol-1/The celebration also was the appropriate time to produce a video that captures the history ofthe college and includes interviews with many of the key players, including Arkansas governorMike Beebe, former UALR chancellor Charles Hathaway, current chancellor Joel Anderson, DeanGood, Little Rock Regional Chamber of Commerce president Jay Chesshir, Arkansas EconomicDevelopment Commission director Maria Haley, as well as EIT faculty, students and industrypartners. Watch the video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v hyfA2KshQ7I.NATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCILThe EIT 10th anniversary gala helped attract all nine members of EIT’s national advisory council,who attended the event Nov. 19 and then spent Nov. 20 at the college. An opening sessionset the stage, and then each member of the council met with the department chair, facultyand select students from the program that most closely aligned with the council member’sexperience and expertise.All council members later sent written reports on their experiences, evaluating the relevanceand worthiness of the programs. Current EIT national advisory council members include:8 Ruth Greenstein, Vice President, Finance and Administration, General Counsel, Institute forDefense Analyses Dr. Per-Kristian Halvorsen, Chief Technology Innovation Officer, Intuit,Inc. Wayne C. Johnson, Independent Consultant and former Vice President of Worldwide UniversityRelations for HP Roger Liska, Dept. Chair and Professor, Construction Science and Management, Clemson University Dr. Bob Lucky, Chair of the Technological Advisory Board of the Federal CommunicationsCommission, Former Director of Research for Telcordia Technologies Dr. Graham R. Mitchell, Professor of Practice, Rauch Business Center, Lehigh University Patrick Pelch, Senior Engineer, Anuvu Incorporated Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Dr. Maxine Savitz, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation, U.S. Dept. of Energy Jim Womble, Former Senior Executive at Acxiom CorporationG E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTEIT BUILDING NEARS COMPLETIONBefore EIT was officially founded in 1999, there was a general knowledge at UALR that anew building would be required to support the growth in students and faculty that wouldaccompany the start of a new college of engineering and information technology.The first 5 million in state money to be used for the as-yet-undesigned building was appropriatedin 1999, and soon visions of what the building could become began to be created. Consistentfund-raising efforts finally yielded a large enough portion of the building’s final cost to breakground in July 2008, and almost exactly two years later the EIT Building had reached substantialcompletion and the faculty and staff of three departments and the dean’s office had occupiedthe fifth and sixth floors.The building’s official opening will come August 19, 2010, when classes begin for the fall 2010semester, and the public ceremony to dedicate the building will be held September 10.Originally, the adjacent two-story auditorium and the fourth floor of the main building werenot going to be fully completed, but when the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees votedin September 2009 to approve a 34.1 million bond issue to fund construction on the UALRcampus, Chancellor Anderson approved the use of 5.5 million to complete the EIT Building.Finishing the fourth floor allowed EIT to make full use of the Steel Case cubicle furniture donatedby Verizon Wireless, as 88 workstations are configured in the two large research bays on thatfloor as well as 44 in the sixth-floor research area and 13 in the research lab adjacent to the HighPerformance Computing Center (see more information in section below).Another important highlight of the new building is its classroom and student lab computingenvironment. For the first time at UALR, a distributed computing system is being implemented,with software and operating system residing on servers in the building’s data centers andonly thin client units, monitors and keyboards (in trays that also accommodate the mouse) onthe classroom tables. This allows much more flexibility in scheduling classrooms and reducessoftware costs as a copy for each machine in each classroom is not required.Another beneficial feature of this computing system is that each student will have a “profile,”so that when he or she logs on, from anywhere on the network, the proper software will beavailable, as will access to all files.Highlights of the new building include (bottom to top): A 206-seat auditorium with all seats wired for data and power A Sub Connection café by Sodexo with seating for 50-plus, including patio tables and awalk-up window. A 24-workstation student computer laboratory in the Student Services suite A large first-floor room dedicated to student organization use. Three server rooms, only one currently utilized, to handle future growth in the building’stechnology infrastructure.G E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY9

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTExecutive Summary (continued) Twelve terraced classrooms, each including between 36 and 40 workstations forstudents, outfitted with an HP thin-client computing terminal, monitor and keyboard. A two-classroom complex configured for use by systems engineering capstonestudent teams, outfitted with Verizon cubicles but leaving the core of the room fordemonstrations and experiments that require room. A networking laboratory and wireless telecom laboratory Three 44-workstation research bays dedicated solely to graduate student research. A high-performance computing cluster (more information below) that when fullyoutfitted will be the second largest such center at an academic institution in Arkansasand an adjacent research area with 13 cubicle work spaces.The building dedication ceremony is scheduled for September 10, and confirmed attendeesinclude Governor Mike Beebe and the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees.TOYOTA QUALITY ADVISORY PANELThanks to her membership on the newly formed Toyota Quality Advisory Panel, Dr. Goodhelped facilitate the panel’s meeting June 9-10 in Little Rock. The event began with a receptionin President Clinton’s private apartment at the Clinton Presidential Center, followed by a seateddinner in the Garden Room on the first floor.Panel chairman Rodney Slater, former Secretary of Transportation in the Clinton administration,greeted a group that included panel members, speakers and local dignitaries.The following day the panel met in the Legends Room at the Jack Stephens Center. The sessionmarked the first time the panel members had heard from external experts in automobile safetyand quality management.Besides Slater and Good, Toyota panel members attending the UALR meeting included: Patricia Goldman, former vice chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board; Brian O’Neill, former president of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety; and Dr. Sheila Widnall, professor at MIT and former Secretary of the U.S. Air Force.Those sharing their views on auto safety and quality-assurance processes at the panel meetingat UALR included:10 Drs. Jeffrey Luftig and Barbara Lawton, University of Colorado engineering professorswho teach the methods of quality pioneer Edwards Deming; Dr. Elizabeth Pierce, the chair of UALR’s Information Science program, who spoke to thegroup about the university’s Information Quality graduate program and its attempts toput the same disciplined processes into place in information quality that Deming did inmanufacturing; Dr. Daniel Roos, MIT engineering professor and the founding director of MIT’s Center forTransportation Studies;G E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORT Dr. Peter Sweatman, University of Michigan professor and Director of the MichiganTransportation Research Institute; Dr. John Morrell, engineering professor at Yale University and a member of the teamthat created the Segway two-wheeled dynamically stabilized human transporter; Dr. Nancy Leveson, engineering professor at MIT; Dr. Jeffrey Runge and Dr. Sue Bailey, both former administrators at the National HighwayTraffic Safety Administration.OUTREACH PROGRAMSVernard Henley, EIT director of educational outreach and diversity, continued to grow thecollege’s important outreach activities with the goal of building a pipeline of young studentswho are interested and have an aptitude in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.He spearheaded a comprehensive effort – detailed in the Outreach section below – thatincluded three summer programs.ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science CampUALR was one of 30 universities nationwide selected to receive a grant to host the ExxonMobilBernard Harris Summer Science Camp, which brought 48 rising 6th through 8th grade studentsfrom across the state to campus for a two-week residential academic program.The program, which attracted more than 175 applicants, is free and was designed by The HarrisFoundation, whose mission is “taking an active role in shaping education in students enteringmiddle school grades”. Forty-eight students (24 boys and 24 girls) from 15 counties and 28schools in 19 school districts across Arkansas were selected to participate in the camp from July5-17, 2009. Forty-five students completed the academically rigorous program.Harris, the first African American to walk in space, is founder and president of The HarrisFoundation and is on the board of directors for the National Math and Science Initiativededicated to improving science and math performance among American students. Dr. Harrisvisited UALR on July 7 and had dinner with the campers before appearing July 8 at Stella BoyleSmith Concert Hall to oversee a “Raft Rally” competition in which the campers created a “raft”from two pieces of aluminum foil and four plastic straws and then saw which raft could hold themost pennies while remaining afloat.High School Research ProgramThe High School Research Program (HSRP) is a three-week residential summer programdesigned to provide high school students with an opportunity to perform STEM-relatedresearch alongside faculty in a college setting. UALR faculty members serve as mentors forthe students and provide unique individual learning opportunities that encourage scientificinquiry and promote the importance of conducting research. In addition, the residentialprogram provides students with an opportunity to live on campus and acquire skills necessaryto ensure successful matriculation.Students were selected based on their academic merit, teachers’ recommendations, and theirexpressed written desire to participate in the program. In an effort to provide more STEMG E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY11

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTExecutive Summary (continued)related project work, EIT partnered with the College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) tocreate a larger pool of projects, which resulted in an increased applicant pool. Twenty-four(24) of the 48 students who applied to the program were accepted (50 percent acceptancerate). Applicants came from 16 Arkansas counties. Nineteen students (10 male and 9 female)enrolled in and completed the program.Ninety-two percent (92 percent) of the accepted students had a high school GPA of 3.50 orhigher. Fifty-eight percent (58 percent) of the applicants had a high school GPA of 3.50 or higher.Engineering Scholars ProgramThe Engineering Scholars Program (ESP) is a two-week residential summer program designed toincrease the number of students entering engineering programs in Arkansas through exposureto hands-on engineering projects, plant trips, and interaction with industry engineers. Inaddition, the ESP includes counseling and advising sessions to assist students in preparingfor college. The exposure to engineering and counseling and advising sessions will help highschool students make informed choices on appropriate course work during their high schoolyears to prepare to pursue careers in engineering.Students were selected based on their academic merit, teachers’ recommendations, andexpressed written desire to participate in the program. Sixteen of the 39 students who appliedto the program were accepted (41 percent acceptance rate). Fourteen students (11 male and3 female) enrolled in the program (88 percent enrollment rate) and all successfully completedthe program.All of the accepted students had a high school GPA of 3.0 or greater. Eighty-eight percent (88percent) of the accepted students had a high school GPA of 3.3 or greater.HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTERNational Science Foundation grants have allowed EIT to expand the high-performancecomputing center that initially was installed in the ETAS building and is moving to a 2,000-squarefoot, raised-floor, state-of-the-art data center on the sixth floor of the new EIT Building. Thecenter will be managed by Kenji Yoshigoe, associate professor in Computer Science.UALR’s Rocks 4.3 cluster will consist of 64 Dell PowerEdge machines (each with eight Xeonprocessors and 16GB RAM, for a total of 512 cores), 4TB storage, Gigabit Ethernet, and Infinibandinterconnection among computing nodes for minimal IPC latency as well as between computingnodes and a 16TB Lustre parallel file system for fast file access.It has the theoretical peak performance of 5.45Tflops (or 5.45 trillion floating point operationsper second). The cluster is built for running large-scale, distributed-memory multiprocessingwith MPI and for running large numbers of independent jobs simultaneously. The cluster iscurrently under a major upgrade to install Rocks 5.3 and expand the parallel file systemcapacity to 40TB. Furthermore, 16 new machines interconnected with 40Gbps links will havethe capability to form a virtual symmetrical multiprocessor (SMP) system ideal for both highly12G E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTparallelized codes across multiple nodes and large-memory solutions for numerical simulationand data analysis, and its performance will surpass that of a significantly more expensive SMPsystem available on the market today.Finally, a 12-core machine with 48GB memory will serve as a “data mover” to assure seamlesstransfer of tera-scale data to the HPC cluster from collaborating institutions.Our cluster has gained demand and popularity, and has been utilized in various researchprojects, including: Molecular Hybrid Monte-Carlo/Data-Mining, Monte Carlo Modeling of Light Penetration into Deep Tissues, Modeling of HPC system, Performance Evaluation of Wireless Communication Systems, Analysis of Security in Heterogeneous Computer Networks, Gene Sequence Matching, Molecular Folding, and Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) Competition.Upon the completion of the current upgrade, five of the eight rack units in the room will befilled with the systems mentioned above. The remaining racks will be filled as needed over thenext two years. The HPC data center has sufficient space, power, and cooling capacity to hostup to 22 rack units, allowing future growth.HONORARY DEGREEEIT in May presented an honorary doctoral degree to Dr. Thomas Peterson, the head of theNational Science Foundation’s engineering directorate. Dr. Peterson came to UALR on May 16and spent most of the day with the engineering faculty, first helping the group understandNSF’s current priorities and then spending time with younger faculty members counseling withthem on their specific research projects.ACCREDITATION ACTIVITIESBoth the Construction Management and Systems Engineering departments received visitsfrom teams tasked with assessing the departments’ worthiness for reaccreditation. Bothdepartments received favorable initial reports with final reports expected soon.CURRICULUM ADDITIONSThe Arkansas Department of Higher Education approved two new programs in EIT: Ph.D. in integrated computing B.S. in construction engineeringG E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY13

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTExecutive Summary (continued)EXTERNAL AFFAIRSIt was a busy year for Kelley Bass, assistant dean of external affairs, who oversaw the two largestprojects of the year – the EIT 10th anniversary gala and the EIT Building project – and coordinatedthe college’s most successful summer intern program to date.Through his work with Verizon Wireless on a variety of initiatives, Kelley made the contacts withthe Verizon public affairs group that led to an introduction to the facilities team leader. Thatmeeting led to the ultimate donation of more than 170 Steelcase cubicle workstations, eightsets of wooden executive office furniture and 50 portable, adjustable-height tables, all of whichare now being utilized in the new EIT Building. The cost of the donated furniture from Verizon,if purchased new, is more than 650,000.Kelley also negotiated the teardown, storage, delivery and rebuilding of the Verizon furniturewith Office Furniture Services, with a total cost of 63,000 to EIT, less than 10 percent of thenew-purchase cost.Working closely with Information Science systems administrator Jim Menth, Kelley worked onthe purchase of the computer equipment for the new EIT Building, meeting often with Dell andHP before finally securing a successful HP bid of 698,000 (excluding sales tax) compared withDell’s bid in excess of 1 million.Kelley arranged visits to EIT or visited on-site with senior executives from a number of companiesand critical EIT partners, including: Chesapeake Energy LM Glasfiber (now LM Wind Power) Mainstream Technologies Welspun Tubular Acxiom Staley, Inc. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Southwest Power Pool Arkansas Economic Development Commission Arkansas Association of General ContractorsKelley also developed a new program to charge external users of the Virtual Reality Center –primarily contractors – 1,500 to model clients’ new buildings and provide the opportunity forthe clients to virtually “tour” the buildings before ground on the project is even broken.The Museum of Discovery invited Kelley to join its Board of Directors, and first-year highlightsof his term included arranging Vernard Henley to include the museum as a day-long activity forthe 48 children in the Bernard Harris ExxonMobil Summer Science Camp (see Outreach sectionbelow); introducing Dr. Haydar Al-Shukri to the museum executives, who enlisted his guidance14G E O R G E W. D O N A G H E YCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

UALR’S GEORGE W. DONAGHEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY2009-10 ANNUAL REPORTin planning and executing its new earthquake exhibit; connecting museum executives with Dr.Alex Biris, who participated in the museum’s Nano Days initiative.Finally, Kelley oversaw an expanded internship program that improved the communicationbetween potential employers and potential employees. It was the most successful to date withmore than 30 interns placed, including 15 at Welspun Tubular, the Indian pipe company with aplant at the Little Rock Port.SELECTED DEPARTMENTAL NEWSIn Construction Management: For the third year in a row, the Provost’s Assessment Advisory Group gave the ConstructionManagement Department an award for Excellence in Assessment and provided a 500assessment grant. For the second straight year, the Construction Management Department was the firstacademic unit on campus to have 100 percent of its faculty and staff donate to theCampus Campaign.In Computer Science: At the end of the 2009-2010 academic year, after chairing the department for fiveyears, Dr. Srini Ramaswamy transitioned to industry as the head of the IndustrialSoftwar

ualr’s george w. donaghey college of engineering and information technology 2009-10 annual report Twelve terraced classrooms, each including between 36 and 40 workstations for students, outfitted with an