Transcription

2019 Community Health Needs AssessmentImplementation Plan

2019 Community Health Needs AssessmentImplementation PlanLiberty Hospital identified and prioritized three healthcare issues to focusits strategic planning and resources based upon the data, reports, surveyinformation, and patient population served.The top three health issues identified for the implementation plan are Mental Health,Chronic Disease and Obesity.1Mental Health:In 2016 it was estimated that almost half a million adults in Missouri hadexperienced serious psychological distress in the past year. These individualsalso were more likely to abuse or be dependent on alcohol or illicit drugs duringthe same time period. The Northland is no exception, as we see the impact ofmental health issues and drug abuse on the community, and how the problemcontinues to grow. Liberty Hospital has partnered with Signature PsychiatricHospital to address this health problem and as such uniquely positioned to makean impact on this serious issue.Nearly 90 percent (88.9%) of the survey respondents to the communityhealth assessment survey living in the Liberty Hospital primary service areasrated mental health as the top health problem in the community.Data from exploreMOhealth data tracker reveals that depression disorderis a major health issue in Clay and Platte Counties, with 30% of the populationin Platte County and 25% of the population in Clay County reporting incidentsof clinical depression.Access to treatment is a growing problem in the Northland, and across the state,as resources are not expanding at the rate of need. The recent closingof Two Rivers Psychiatric Center located in the Kansas City metro addsto that burden.The cost of caring for persons with mental health issues is an economicburden on the state. Hospital charges in Missouri for patients admitted withmental health issues ranged from 12,000 - 31,000 per stay, which totaledhalf a billion dollars in 2014.Suicide rates in Clay and Platte counties exceed the rates in Missouri overall, andare higher than what was reported in the Liberty Hospital 2016Community Health Needs Assessment.Substance abuse, Opioid abuse in particular, is the fastest growing drugproblem across the U.S. and in Missouri.Data from the 2016 Missouri Student Survey of middle and high schoolstudents reveal that one in eight middle school students have seriously consideredsuicide in the past year; one in six high school students have considered suicide,as well as and one in five college student. Suicidal thoughts were highest amongthose students in the 8th and 9th grade.

2Chronic Disease:Chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes,collectively claim the lives of seven out of every ten Missouriansannually. While these diseases are the most deadly, they are also inmany instances preventable. Lifestyle choices impact the onset andseverity of chronic diseases, and often lead to their progression todisability or death.Forty-five percent (45%) of the survey respondents living in the LibertyHospital zip code service area identified chronic diseases as aserious health problem in the Northland.The Clay County population suffers from diabetes, asthma, cancer andheart disease at higher rates than the state as a whole.Cancer remains the leading cause of death in Clay County withAfrican Americans experiencing even higher cancer mortality rates.Mortality from diabetes has increased in the past four years in both Clayand Platte counties.Chronic disease remains a primary cause of hospitalization in the Northland.3Obesity:A significant number of the population served by Liberty Hospital rankedobesity as a top health problem.Obesity was identified as a major health problem by 38.7% of thesurvey respondents.Missouri has the 17th highest rate of adult obesity inAmerica at 32.5%. In 2014 that rate was 23.9%.In Clay County the obesity rate is 28.4%, compared toPlatte County which is 26%.Proper diet including fruits and vegetables are part of healthy eatingand reduce the propensity for obesity. Nearly 90% of the adults inthe Northland do not eat an adequate diet of fruits and vegetables daily.Physical activity and exercise are important components of a healthylifestyle and reduces the propensity for an overweight population tobecome obese. In the Northland, however, 20% to 25% of theadult population are not getting leisure-time physical activity or exercise.Given the magnitude of the data contained in the 2019 Liberty HospitalCommunity Health Needs Assessment and the healthcare concerns ofthe Northland, Liberty Hospital has identified the following health initiatives forthe Implementation Plan.

123Focus on early identification and intervention of mental health issuesin the Northland’s school-age population. Focus resources and educationon the youth population to prevent the need for more serious clinicalmental health treatment and hospitalization.Addressing those factors that lead to chronic illness in the school ageand adolescent population, including lack of education, poor diet andlack of physical activity/exercise, to reduce the progression of the healthcondition to chronic disease state.Provide education and resources to the Northland about the importance ofa healthy lifestyle, activity, and healthy eating to minimize the risk ofbecoming overweight, and ultimately obese.While these health initiatives are ambitious given the numbers of personsimpacted in the Northland or otherwise affected by these health concerns,the results of the data clearly lead Liberty Hospital to select these initiatives.An additional consideration is the interrelated nature of these health issues.In other words, if there is improvement in one of the three categories, thenthat will more than likely impact the other two. In addition, there are otherorganizations, i.e., schools, providers, public health departments, theNorthland Health Alliance, among others whose focus is to improve thehealth of the Northland population. Liberty Hospital will partner with theseorganizations to insure resources and efforts are collaborative, not duplicative,so that we have a better opportunity to achieve these goals.

1INITIATIVE #1: MENTAL HEALTHLiberty Hospital has formed a special subcommittee of professionals andexperts in the mental health arena, primarily focused on the child/adolescencepopulation, this group will define, plan and review implementation of thehealth initiative designed to address this problem, Given its partnership withSignature Psychiatric Hospitals, specifically it’s outpatiet clinic, it is uniquelypositioned to address this health concern in the Northland.Committee Chair:Peggy Ford, Director Risk Management/Compliance Officer,Liberty HospitalCommittee Members:NameLisa St AubynKendra CallawayJessica MeisenheimerAngie KreegerVicky WardMidori CarpenterDiane KippingOrganizationSignature Psychiatric HospitalLiberty Alliance for YouthLiberty Public SchoolsPreferred Family HealthTri-County Mental HealthLiberty HospitalLiberty HospitalTitlePresident/CEOPrevention Program DirectorDirector of Special ProgramsAdolescent CoordinatorManager of PreventionExecutive Director, FoundationMgr Employee Health/WellnessPrimary Goal:To better understand the onset of mental health issues in our school-agepopulation; and focus resources, education, and intervention programs toaddress the needs of these children early on in an effort to minimize progressionof the childhood issues into acute/chronic mental health issues in adulthood.Strategy:To work in collaboration with Liberty Alliance for Youth, the Liberty PublicSchool system, Signature Psychiatric Hospital, Tri-County Mental Health,and Preferred Family Health to develop programs that are focused on the needsof the school-age/adolescent population dealing with mental disorders,stress, substance abuse, among other issues.

Objectives:Identify the population in the Northland that is at high risk for developingmental health disorders, and learn about what, why, when and wherethese issues occur.Review current resources focused on this population and identify additionalresources to assist in these efforts.Consider new programs to enhance what already in place, with specificfocus on substance abuse (drugs, alcohol and vaping).Continue to provide education among the Northland population to increaseawareness of this health issue and encourage early intervention to address it.Assist with grant requests and collaborate with others to acquire funding toenhance resources to address the number one health concern in ourservice area.Measurement/Evaluation of Progress:Establish a benchmark at the onset to determine the magnitude and severityof the problem as it is currently.Track attendance, numbers of children participating in prevention programs,and determine if there is an increase in participants.Use indirect and direct measure from mental health providers to determine ifthe focus of intervention and resources are in alignment with the goal, orneed to be modified.Survey those participating in education and intervention programs focusedon school-age/high school population to determine if programs are successful.Focus education on parents and child care providers to increase awareness,and track participation.Continue to evaluate effectiveness of strategies, progress of plan, and modifyas needed to achieve goal.

2INITIATIVE #2: CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTIONLiberty Hospital has formed a special subcommittee of professionals andexperts that treat, care for, and provide education to the patient populationthat suffers from chronic diseases. This subcommittee is charged with defining,planning and reviewing the implementation of the health initiative to addressthe number two health problem of the Liberty Hospital service area, chronic disease.Liberty Hospital is the owner of Norterre. Norterre is a community comprised of threedistinct facilities that focus on health and wellness, skilled nursing, memory care andassisted living which makes it well-positioned to address this health concern.Committee Chair:Peggy Ford, Director Risk Management/Compliance Officer,Liberty HospitalCommittee Members:NameMichelle TremainKatie BurrageMidori CarpenterDiane KippingDr. Susan AndersonBrenda LoveladyDennie AndersonOrganizationLiberty Hospital Diabetes EducationCenterNorterre/The LaurelLiberty HospitalLiberty HospitalLiberty HospitalLiberty HospitalLiberty HospitalTitleProgram ManagerAdministratorExecutive Director, FoundationMgr Employee Health/WellnessPain Management PhysicianDirector Home Health/HospiceDirector Case ManagementPrimary Goal:Provide education, resources and interventional programs for school-ageand young-adult population to reduce the progression of chronicdisease in adulthood.Strategy:In collaboration with Liberty Public School system, Norterre, area primarycare physicians and other providers, develop education, training and programsto address the lifestyle choices for the youth population toward healthyeating, physical activities, exercise and overall wellness.

Objectives:Identify the school-age population in the Northland that is at high riskfor developing chronic diseases in adulthood due to lack of health lifestyleopportunities. For example, CHNA survey participants identified that manyof the lower socioeconomic population did not have healthy eating optionswithin walking distance, only fast foods.Review current resources provided in the Northland and in the schoolsystem regarding wellness, healthy eating, physical activity andidentify additional resources to assist in these efforts.Consider new programs to enhance what is already in place, with specificfocus on prevention of chronic disease.Continue to provide education in the Northland to increase awareness ofthe importance of this wellness issue and encourage early intervention toprevent progression into more serious diseases.Assist with grant requests at state and federal level in collaboration withother organizations to receive funding in order to enhance resources toaddress the number two health concern in the population Liberty Hospital serves.Measurement/Evaluation of Progress:Establish a benchmark at the onset to determine the magnitude and severityof the problem as it is currently.Track attendance, numbers of children participating in education/preventionprograms, and determine if there is an increase in participants.Use indirect and direct measures from family practice providers to determineif the focus of intervention and resources are in alignment with the goal, orneed to be modified.Survey those participating in education and awareness of the health issue inthe child/adolescent population to determine if we have moved the needle inthe right direction.Focus education on parents and childcare providers to increase awareness,and track participation.Ongoing evaluation of strategies to determine effectiveness and modify asneeded to achieve goal.

3INITIATIVE #3: OBESITY PREVENTION/WELLNESSLiberty Hospital has formed a special subcommittee of professionals and experts,especially in the child/adolescence population in order to define, planand review implementation of the health initiative to address the obesity problemof the population served by Liberty Hospital. Given its ownership ofNorterre, it is uniquely positioned to address this health concern in the Northland.Committee Chair:Diane Kipping, Manager Community/Employee Health/ Wellness, Liberty HospitalCommittee Members:NameRon GocheeMidori CarpenterPeggy FordJessica MeisenheimerOrganizationNorterre/The AuroraLiberty HospitalLiberty HospitalLiberty Public SchoolsTitleManagerExecutive Director, FoundationDirector Risk Mgt/ ComplianceDirector of Special ProgramsPrimary Goal:Provide education, resources and interventional programs for school-age andadolescent population, to prevent children from becoming overweight, and/orobese, due to poor lifestyle choices.Strategy:In collaboration with Liberty Public School system, the Aurora Health &Wellness Center, primary care physicians, and others, develop education,training and programs to address the lifestyle choices for the youth populationtoward healthy eating, physical activities, exercise and overall wellness.

Objectives:Identify the school-age population in the Northland that is at high risk forbecoming overweight or obese due to lack of wellness opportunities.Review current resources provided in the Northland and in the schoolsystem regarding wellness, healthy eating and physical activity, and identifyadditional resources to assist in these efforts.Utilize the Aurora Health & Wellness Center for its fitness and nutritiontraining, and identify areas where additional programs may be added forthe school-age population.Consider new programs to enhance what is already in place, with specificfocus on prevention of obesity.Continue to provide education in the Northland to increase awareness of theimportance of wellness and prevention of obesity, and encourage earlyintervention to prevent progression into more serious chronic diseases.Measurement/Evaluation of Progress:Establish a benchmark at the onset to determine the magnitude andseverity of the problem as it is currently.Track attendance, numbers of children participating in education/preventionprograms, and determine if there is an increase in participants.Use indirect and direct measures from family practice providers/ fitnesscenters to determine if the focus of intervention and resources are inalignment with the goal, or need to be modified.Survey those participating in education and awareness of the health issuein the child/adolescent population to determine if we have moved theneedle in the right direction.Focus education on parents and child care providers to increaseawareness, and track those numbers.Continue to evaluate strategies and make changes as needed to achieve goal.

Community Health Needs Assessment. Substance abuse, Opioid abuse in particular, is the fastest growing drug problem across the U.S. and in Missouri. Data from the 2016 Missouri Student Survey of middle and high school students reveal that one in eight middle