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Mariannette Miller-Meeks Research ReportThe following report contains research on Mariannette Miller-Meeks, a Republican candidatein Iowa’s 2nd district. Research for this research book was conducted by the DCCC’sResearch Department in August 2019. By accepting this report, you are acceptingresponsibility for all information and analysis included. Therefore, it is your responsibility toverify all claims against the original documentation before you make use of it. Make sure youunderstand the facts behind our conclusions before making any specific charges againstanyone.Mariannette Miller-MeeksRepublican Candidate inIowa’s 2nd Congressional DistrictResearch Memo – 2019Last Updated August 2019Prepared by the DCCC Research Department

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 2Dr. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (IA-02) MemoSignificant Findings Miller-Meeks supported cutting funding or benefits from Medicare, and proposed ideas that would endMedicare as we know it. Miller-Meeks questioned the need to provide current levels of Medicare benefits if it requiredincreasing taxes, and appeared to support phasing out half of Medicare’s funding stream. Miller-Meeks blamed Medicare funding shortfalls on “on overuse, saying [seniors] who get care forfree are prone to use it unnecessarily like patients with mild sore throats who'd otherwise wouldgargle with salt water.” In 2008, Miller-Meeks supported privatizing Social Security, supporting “some sort of private, butlimited, account for some of the funds.” Miller-Meeks supported raising the federal retirement age, which would impact Medicare andSocial Security. In 2018, Miller-Meeks refused to say she would repeal the Affordable Care Act – even though shesupported repealing the law before that. In 2014, Miller-Meeks decided to run for office “largely in response to her negative feelings aboutthe Affordable Care Act” Miller-Meeks said that health insurance should only be required to cover immunization, prevention, andcatastrophic events. Miller-Meeks: “If people are paying for it out of their debit account, they'll utilize those resourcesin a great manner.” Miller-Meeks said she did not want health insurance be required to cover maternity care. In 2020, Miller-Meeks agreed that the Department of Education should be abolished. Miller-Meeks was rejected by the Iowa State Senate when she was nominated to the Hawk-I Board thatadvised the state on health care coverage for uninsured children of working families. Lawmakersclaimed her time as head of the Department of Public Health concerned them. In 2019, Miller-Meeks voted for a bill that reduced unemployment insurance when an employer goes outof business. Miller-Meeks voted to implement work requirements for Medicaid recipients. Miller-Meeks refused to say whether nutrition assistance should be separated from the Farm Bill andsaid the top item purchased with food stamps was Mountain Dew.

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 3Background BORN: Mariannette Jane Miller-Meeks , September 6, 1955, Herlong, CAFAMILY: Curt Meeks (Husband), Johnathon (Son), Taylor (Daughter)EDUCATION: San Antonio Junior College, General Studies (1972-1974); Texas Christian University, BSN,Nursing (1974-1976); University of Southern California, MSEd, Masters in Science and Education (19791980); UT Health San Antonio, MD (1982-1986); UT Health San Antonio, Intern, General Surgery (19861987); University of Iowa, Resident, Department of Ophthalmology (1988-1991); University of Michigan,Fellowship, Glaucoma (1993-1994)PROFESSIONAL: United States Army, Operating and Ward Nurse (1976-1982); University of Michigan,Department of Ophthalmology, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology (1991-1994); University of IowaHospitals and Clinics, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology (1994-1997); United States Army Reserve,Medical Services (1983-2000), Heartland Eye Care, Private Practice Ophthalmologist (1997-2008); IowaDepartment of Public Health (IDPH), Director (2011-2014); Great River Eye Specialists, Ophthalmologist(2015-Present)POLITICAL: Iowa State Senator, District 41 (2019-Present); Ran for Iowa 2nd Congressional district in 2008,2010, and 2014; Director of Iowa Department of Public Health, (2010-2013) (Appointed by Govenor TerryBranstad)COMMITTEES: Iowa State Senate Human Resources Committee, Chairwoman; Iowa State SenateAppropriations Committee; Iowa State Senate Commerce Committee; Iowa State Senate State Veterans Affairs(Vice-Chair)NON-PROFIT: Soccer coach; Volunteer for Court-Appointed Special Advocates for children; Volunteer atfree medical clinics.ORGANIZATIONS: Council on Human Services; Parish council of St. Mary's Church in OttumwaLICENSES: Ophthalmology License (26438); Medical License (MD-26438) ; Former NurseHealth CareMiller-Meeks Attempted To Hide Her Support For The Repeal Of The Affordable Care ActMiller-Meeks Refused to Say Whether She Would Repeal ACA, Which She Favored In The Past. “WhenMiller-Meeks debated David Loebsack in 2014, ‘Miller-Meeks mentioned the Affordable Care Act immediately inthe debate as being unaffordable, she refused to say whether she'd repeal the bill. Loebsack successfully called heron that, saying she's been for repealing it in the past and he's not sure where she is now. She also declined to saywhether nutrition assistance should be separated from the farm bill, choosing instead to talk about curing poverty.”[Des Moines Register, 8/29/18]2014: Miller-Meeks Decided To Run For Office “Largely In Response To Her Negative Feelings About TheAffordable Care Act”Miller-Meeks: “Looking At The Affordable Care Act, There Are Ways We Can Change It, Modify It,And/Or, If Possible, Repeal It, But You Have To Gain The Senate, But At Least, Let's Make It Work ForPeople.” “Miller-Meeks resigned from her post at the Public Health Department to run for office. She is runninglargely in response to her negative feelings about the Affordable Care Act. ‘Looking at the Affordable Care Act,there are ways we can change it, modify it, and/or, if possible, repeal it, but you have to gain the Senate, but atleast, let's make it work for people,’ Miller-Meeks said.” [Daily Iowan, 2/27/14v]Miller-Meeks Believed People Ought To Choose Their Own Kind Of Insurance

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 4Miller-Meeks Said People Should Be Able To Choose Their Own Insurance Coverage, And InsuranceCompanies Should Be Able to Sell Policies Across State Lines. “Miller-Meeks argues that her medical backgroundgives her a unique perspective on health care issues and that predictions she made in 2010 have come true. ‘We havea great deal of credibility with what happened with the health care bill,’ she says. Miller-Meeks has argued that peopleought to be able to choose their own kind of insurance coverage (the new health care law sets minimum standards forcoverage). She also says insurance companies ought to be able to sell policies across state lines.” [The Quad-CityTimes, 5/27/19]Miller-Meeks Said That Health Insurance Should Only Be Required To Cover Immunization,Prevention, And Catastrophic Events; “If People Are Paying For It Out Of Their Debit Account,They'll Utilize Those Resources In A Great Manner”2009: Miller-Meeks Opposed Democratic Health Care Legislation, And Said That Health Insurance ShouldOnly Be Required To Cover Immunization, Prevention, And Catastrophic Events. “Michael Maharry, aMuscatine doctor who operates a family practice in Iowa City, supports the largely Democratic legislation for thesimple reason that he believes people have a moral right to health care in the United States. [ ] MariannetteMiller-Meeks, a nonpracticing ophthalmologist in Ottumwa, agrees with the ideal of health care for all, but says theproposed legislation doesn't do accomplish that task. [ ] She said the biggest fears people have in coverage areimmunization, prevention, and catastrophic events. Miller-Meeks said those could be covered and the governmentcould fund an account for low-income people so it would still be subsidized. ‘If people are paying for it out of theirdebit account, they'll utilize those resources in a great manner,’ Miller-Meeks said. The problem with that, MillerMeeks admits, is that each state has different coverage requirements. So she proposes ending that practice andrequiring coverage just for the three things she believes people fear most. Miller-Meeks said the government alsocould gradually phase out employer deduction but offer individuals the same deduction so they could choose theirbest means of care.” [The Hawk Eye (Burlington, Iowa), 9/6/09]Miller-Meeks: “If People Are Paying For It Out Of Their Debit Account, They'll Utilize ThoseResources In A Great Manner.” She said the biggest fears people have in coverage are immunization,prevention, and catastrophic events. Miller-Meeks said those could be covered and the government could fundan account for low-income people so it would still be subsidized. ‘If people are paying for it out of their debitaccount, they'll utilize those resources in a great manner,’ Miller-Meeks said. The problem with that, MillerMeeks admits, is that each state has different coverage requirements. So she proposes ending that practice andrequiring coverage just for the three things she believes people fear most. Miller-Meeks said the governmentalso could gradually phase out employer deduction but offer individuals the same deduction so they couldchoose their best means of care.” [The Hawk Eye (Burlington, Iowa), 9/6/09]A Draft Of What Became The Affordable Care Act Was Being Debated In September 2009. [CNN,6/28/12]Miller-Meeks Said She Did Not Think Maternity Care Should Be Required In Health Care CoverageMiller-Meeks: “I Don't Particularly Want To Have Maternity Or In Vitro Fertilization Or AdoptionCovered Within My Policy, All Of Those Things Add To The Cost.” [1:59] “I like to say that at my age, I wouldlike to have my health insurance policy cover catastrophic cover prevention and cover immunizations, which westill need to be immunized. However, I can't purchase a policy like that in my state. I don't particularly want to havematernity or in vitro fertilization or adoption covered within my policy, all of those things add to the cost.”[Mariannette Miller Meeks Conversation on Health Care, 9/4/09]In 2009, Mariannette Miller-Meeks Was Approximately 54 Years Old. [Nexis, accessed 6/15/20]

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 5Miller-Meeks Voted Along Party Lines In Favor Of Implementing Work Requirements ForMedicaid RecipientsMiller-Meeks Voted Along Party Lines In Favor Of Implementing Work Requirements For MedicaidRecipients. “Legislation moving through the state Capitol would require able-bodied Iowans to work, get involvedin community activities or be enrolled in school to be a part of Medicaid. Medicaid is the health care program forpoor and disabled Iowans. The Republican-controlled Senate voted 32-17, along party lines, Tuesday to advancethe bill, which focuses on people who became eligible for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.” [Des MoinesRegister, 3/20/19; Iowa State Legislature, S.F. 538, Journal of the Senate, 3/19/19]Headline: The Gazette: “Iowa Medicaid Work Requirement Bill Faces Dead End.” [The Gazette, 3/28/19]Miller-Meeks Supported A Policy That Required Hospitals To Publish Prices Of Their Services,Despite Criticism The Policy Would Drive Up CostsJune 2019: Miller-Meeks Participated In Trump’s Executive Order Signing On Improving TheTransparency[Twitter, 6/24/19]Miller-Meeks Attended Trump’s Executive Order Signing On The Improving Price and QualityTransparency in American Healthcare. “In June, Miller-Meeks, who at one time was director of the IowaDepartment of Public Health, was at the White House when President Donald Trump signed an executive order onImproving Price and Quality Transparency in American Healthcare to Put Patients First. ‘Like me, Iowans areconcerned about rising health care costs, premiums and drugs,’ she said in her resignation letter. ‘They have seenlittle progress dealing with a crisis on our southern border, despite the repeated efforts of President Donald Trump,and there does not seem to be an immediate resolution. ‘Like me, Iowans are concerned about rising health carecosts, premiums and drugs,’ she said in her resignation letter.” [Sioux City Journal, 7/15/19]

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 6NPR: The Executive Order Required Hospitals To Publish Prices That Reflected What People Paid ForServices. “‘Hospitals will be required to publish prices that reflect what people pay for services,’ said PresidentTrump at a White House event. ‘You will get great pricing. Prices will come down by numbers that youwouldn't believe. The cost of healthcare will go way, way down.’ Like several of President Trump's otherhealth policy-related announcements, today's executive order doesn't spell out specific actions, but directs thedepartment of Health and Human Services to develop a policy and then undertake a lengthy rule-makingprocess.” [NPR, 6/24/19]NPR: The Executive Order Did Not “Spell Out Specific Actions, But Direct[ed] The Department OfHealth And Human Services To Develop A Policy And Then Undertake A Lengthy Rule-MakingProcess.” “’Hospitals will be required to publish prices that reflect what people pay for services,’ saidPresident Trump at a White House event. ‘You will get great pricing. Prices will come down by numbers thatyou wouldn't believe. The cost of healthcare will go way, way down.’ Like several of President Trump's otherhealth policy-related announcements, today's executive order doesn't spell out specific actions, but directs thedepartment of Health and Human Services to develop a policy and then undertake a lengthy rule-makingprocess.” [NPR, 6/24/19]Health Care Industry Claimed The Order Would “Have The Unintended Consequence Of Pushing PricesUp, Rather Than Down”Health Care Industry Claimed The Order Would “Have The Unintended Consequence Of Pushing PricesUp, Rather Than Down.” “Push back from various corners of the healthcare industry came quickly, with hospitaland health plan lobbying organizations arguing this transparency requirement would have the unintendedconsequence of pushing prices up, rather than down. ‘Publicly disclosing competitively negotiated, proprietaryrates will reduce competition and push prices higher — not lower — for consumers, patients, and taxpayers,’ saidMatt Eyles, CEO of America's Health Insurance Plans in a statement. He says it will perpetuate ‘the old days of theAmerican health care system paying for volume over value. We know that is a formula for higher costs and worsecare for everyone.’ Some health economists and industry observers without a vested interest expressed a similarview. Larry Levitt, senior vice president for health reform the Kaiser Family Foundation, tweeted that although theidea of greater price transparency makes sense from the perspective of consumer protection, it doesn't guaranteelower prices. ‘I'm skeptical that disclosure of health care prices will drive prices down, and could even increaseprices once hospitals and doctors know what their competitors down the street are getting paid,’ Levitt wrote.”[NPR, 6/24/19]Miller-Meeks Questioned The Need To Provide Current Levels Of Medicare Benefits If It RequiredIncreasing TaxesMiller-Meeks: “Just Like Fannie Mae And Freddie Mac, It's A Government-Sponsored Entity [ ] IfMedicare Is Underfunded, In Order To Provide The Current Level Of Benefits That We Provide To Seniors,Then How Much Taxation Do People Want To Pay For That?” “Miller-Meeks, however, says that's a falseargument. She said insurance companies have to worry about a bottom line, whereas the government can increasetaxes. ‘Just like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, it's a government-sponsored entity,’ Miller-Meeks said. ‘If Medicareis underfunded, in order to provide the current level of benefits that we provide to seniors, then how much taxationdo people want to pay for that?’” [The Hawk Eye (Burlington, Iowa), 9/6/09]Miller-Meeks: “The Mere Fact That We Have Insurance Causes Costs To Rise.” “Providers in the healthcaresystem see this all the time, when someone else is paying the bill, you purchase things that you would not havewhen you are paying for them out of your own pocket. So the mere fact that we have insurance causes costs to rise.In addition to that, as consumers and constituents, we've asked our legislators within our states to add on morebenefits to our health insurance.” [Mariannette Miller Meeks Conversation on Health Care, 9/4/09]

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 7Miller-Meeks Blamed Medicare Funding Shortfalls On Overuse, Saying Seniors With Sore Throats ShouldGargle Salt Water Rather Than Use The Health Care System UnnecessarilyMiller-Meeks Blamed Medicare Funding Shortfalls On “Overuse, Saying Those Who Get Care For Free AreProne To Use It Unnecessarily Like Patients With Mild Sore Throats Who'd Otherwise Would Gargle WithSalt Water.” “Mariannette Miller-Meeks, a nonpracticing ophthalmologist in Ottumwa, agrees with the ideal ofhealth care for all, but says the proposed legislation doesn't do accomplish that task. [ ] To begin tackling themyriad problems of the current health care system, Miller-Meeks proposes changing Medicare reimbursement,something finds support with Maharry and much of Iowa's federal delegation. Blocking that, though, are the morepopulous states have more representatives in Congress who support status quo. Compounding the problem, theMedicare fund is running out of money. Miller-Meeks blames the bankruptcy on overuse, saying those who get carefor free are prone to use it unnecessarily like patients with mild sore throats who'd otherwise would gargle with saltwater.” [The Hawk Eye (Burlington, Iowa), 9/6/09]Miller-Meeks Blamed The Rise Of Health Care Costs On Medicare And Overuse. [0:28] “Two words,competition and insurance. If you look at the cost of health care in the United States, the rapid rise began in 1970.And the rise in health care costs exceeded inflation. This is because Medicare was instituted in 1965. As seniorsbecame more adept at utilizing the Medicare system to pay for care that they previously had not accessed, the costescalated. We also know from numerous health care studies [ ] show that when someone doesn't bear the cost ofhealth care, they utilize more. So overutilization began to be the norm.” [Mariannette Miller Meeks Conversationon Health Care, 9/4/09]Miller-Meeks Appeared To Support Phasing Out Medicare’s Funding StreamMiller-Meeks Said The Government Could Gradually Phase Out The Employer Deduction. “The problemwith that, Miller-Meeks admits, is that each state has different coverage requirements. So she proposes ending thatpractice and requiring coverage just for the three things she believes people fear most. Miller-Meeks said thegovernment also could gradually phase out employer deduction but offer individuals the same deduction so theycould choose their best means of care.” [The Hawk Eye (Burlington, Iowa), 9/6/09]The Employer Deduction Funds Social Security And Medicare. “The current tax rate for social security is6.2% for the employer and 6.2% for the employee, or 12.4% total. The current rate for Medicare is 1.45% forthe employer and 1.45% for the employee, or 2.9% total. Refer to Publication 15, (Circular E), Employer's TaxGuide for more information; or Publication 51, (Circular A), Agricultural Employer’s Tax Guide foragricultural employers.” [IRS, 2/14/20]Social SecurityMiller-Meeks Supported Privatizing Social SecurityMiller-Meeks Supported “Some Sort Of Private, But Limited, Account For Some Of The [Social Security]Funds.” “Another large entitlement program that could use some help is Social Security, Miller-Meeks said. Thereare some simple solutions that can extend the life of the program. [ ] She also sees that it is difficult forcongressmen to keep their hands off Social Security funds when money is needed elsewhere. For that reason, shesupports some sort of private, but limited, account for some of the funds. She said the private account most likelycould earn better than the 3 percent the government gains.” [Daily Democrat, 5/1/08]

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 8Miller-Meeks Supported Raising The Federal Retirement AgeMiller-Meeks Supported Raising The Federal Retirement Age. “Miller-Meeks said the United States mustrecognize that there is a risk of backlash from young workers if they come to the conclusion they pay for thebenefits and programs geared toward older Americans but will not have similar benefits after they retire. Hersolution is not to cut existing benefits but to take steps to adjust the situation to prevent the costs fromoverwhelming the future workforce. That includes stopping the federal government from raiding accounts like theSocial Security trust fund for unrelated projects and the possibility of raising the federal retirement age. ‘We cannotkeep asking more and more of younger people for programs that politicians have guaranteed for older Americans,’Miller-Meeks said.” [Ottumwa Courier, 8/25/10]EducationMiller-Meeks Agreed The Department Of Education Should Be EliminatedMiller-Meeks Agreed The Department Of Education Should Be Eliminated, And Said Education Should BeLeft To The States To Manage. Schilling said his father would eliminate the Department of Education becauseof the poor quality public education offers, as evidenced by chronically low standardized test scores. ‘We need toget the government out of education and we need to restrict the Environmental Protection Agency,’ Schilling said.Phillips agreed with dissolving the Department of Education, saying public education should be left to states todecide. [ ] Miller-Meeks also said education should be left to states to manage. She said the Departments ofEnergy and Homeland Security could be reduced.” [Dispatch-Argus, 3/27/20]Miller-Meeks Voted In Favor Of Campus Free Speech Bill Despite Concerns That It Would OpenThe Door To Discrimination In Student OrganizationsIowa Public Radio: Miller-Meeks Voted In Favor Of Campus Free Speech Bill Despite Of “Concerns That ItWould Open The Door To Discrimination In Student Organizations.” “A bill that aims to expand free speechrights on public college campuses in Iowa passed the House and Senate this week in spite of concerns that itwould open the door to discrimination in student organizations. The House of Representatives debated the measureThursday. Hite (Rep. Dustin Hite, R-New Sharon) said the bill requires public colleges to promote free expression,avoid trying to protect students from others’ speech, and get rid of ‘free speech zones’ he said unreasonably limitpublic expression to a few areas on campus. Several House Democrats said they agree with most of the bill, butthey said one section could allow discrimination. It says colleges cannot deny benefits to student groups that requiretheir leaders to ‘agree to and support’ the group’s beliefs.Sen. Zach Wahls, D-Coralville, said it could lead tosome people being denied leadership opportunities on campus. ‘This is nothing about a person’s religious beliefs.This is a question about people who have an identity or belong to a group that has historically been marginalized,’Wahls said. ‘Those students are being denied because of who they are. That’s what discrimination is.” [Iowa PublicRadio, 3/14/19; Iowa State Legislature, S.F. 274, Journal of the Senate, 3/11/19]Note: Signed into law by Governor Kim Reynolds March 13, 2019.Miller-Meeks Was Rejected By The State Senate To Serve On The Iowa Hawk-I BoardBecause Her Time As Head Of The Department Of Public Health Concerned LawmakersMiller-Meeks Was Rejected By Iowa Senate To Serve On Healthcare Board2016: Miller-Meeks Was Rejected By Iowa Senate To Serve On Healthcare Board Because Critics WorriedShe Was Too Close To The Branstad Administration. “The Iowa Senate on Thursday rejected Gov. TerryBranstad's nomination of former state health director Mariannette Miller-Meeks to the Iowa Hawk-I Board, which

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 9advises the state on health care coverage for uninsured children of working families. Miller-Meeks needed 34 votes- a two-thirds majority - to be confirmed. Her nomination failed on a 28-18 vote Sen. Janet Petersen, D-DesMoines, who opposed Miller-Meeks' confirmation, said the Hawk-I Board needs a person who will stand up forIowa's families and children, as opposed to someone who will stand with the Branstad administration.” [DesMoines Register, 4/16/16]Lawmakers Claimed Her Time As Head Of The Department Of Public Health Was ConcerningMiller-Meeks’s Time As Head Of The Department Of Public Health Concerned Some Lawmakers. “An IowaSenate panel agreed Monday to move Gov. Terry Branstad’s appointment of Mariannette Miller-Meeks to the stateHawk-I board to the Senate’s confirmation calendar without recommendation. Miller-Meeks, 60, served as directorof the Department of Public Health under Branstad from 2011 to 2013 and three times lost to Democrat DaveLoebsack in the 2nd Congressional District. Some members of the Senate Human Resources Committee haveexpressed concern about her time as head of the Department of Public Health and the appointment to a board thatoversees the state’s children’s health insurance program as it changes to privatized Medicaid services April 1.” [TheGazette, 3/22/16]Senator Mathis, D-Linn, Said Miller-Meeks Was Unhelpful When Mathis Asked For Support On AnAlzheimer's Bill When Miller-Meeks’ Was Director Of The State Department Of Public Health. “All 18no votes came from Iowa Democrats, including Sen. Liz Mathis of Linn County. Mathis raised concerns aboutMiller-Meeks work as director of the Iowa Department of Public Health, saying she was unhelpful whenMathis asked for support on an Alzheimer's bill. ‘When I was advocating for Alzheimer’s patients, theirfamilies and providers who care for people with dementia-related illness, (Miller-Meeks) was unresponsive tomy plea and theirs for two years in a row,’ said Sen. Mathis. ‘That experience, along with other Senators whohave worked with her, convinced me she is not the best choice to join the Hawk-I Board.’” [KCRG, 4/16/16]Critics Said Meeks Was Not The Right Fit Because She Would “Worry About The Reduction In ServicesAnd The Bottom-Line Costs” Instead Of The Human Element. “Critics expressed concern about her time asBranstad’s chief of the state public health agency and her appointment to a state board that provides direction tothe state Department of Human Services on the state’s children’s health insurance program at a time when thegovernor is moving Medicaid services to privately managed care. ‘We need a Hawk-I board member that has astrong knowledge of the health insurance programs that will advocate for affordable, accessible, comprehensivecare for children and not just worry about the reduction in services and the bottom-line costs, especially in thisperiod of transition to a managed care environment,’ said Sen. Amanda Ragan, D-Mason City. ‘This is not a fitthat I think is good for Hawk-I or the state of Iowa, especially in this change.’” [The Gazette, 4/15/16]Gazette: “Quirmbach, D-Ames, Said Miller-Meeks Displayed Weaknesses In Her Commitment, HerListening Skills And Her Failure To Consult With Others Regarding Personnel Decisions During HisInteractions With Her When She Directed The State Department Of Public Health.” “Critics expressedconcern about her time as Branstad’s chief of the state public health agency and her appointment to a stateboard that provides direction to the state Department of Human Services on the state’s children’s healthinsurance program at a time when the governor is moving Medicaid services to privately managed care. ‘Weneed a Hawk-I board member that has a strong knowledge of the health insurance programs that will advocatefor affordable, accessible, comprehensive care for children and not just worry about the reduction in servicesand the bottom-line costs, especially in this period of transition to a managed care environment,’ said Sen.Amanda Ragan, D-Mason City. ‘This is not a fit that I think is good for Hawk-I or the state of Iowa, especiallyin this change.’ Sen. Herman Quirmbach, D-Ames, said Miller-Meeks displayed weaknesses in hercommitment, her listening skills and her failure to consult with others regarding personnel decisions during hisinteractions with her when she directed the state Department of Public Health.” [The Gazette, 4/15/16]

Mariannette Miller -Meeks (IA-02) Memo 10Iowa Hawk-I Board Advised The State On Health Care Coverage For Uninsured Children Of WorkingFamiliesIowa Hawk-I Board Advised The State On Health Care Coverage For Uninsured Children Of WorkingFamilies. “The Iowa Senate on Thursday rejected Gov. Terry Branstad's nomination of former state health directorMariannette Miller-Meeks to the Iowa Hawk-I Board, which advises the state on health care coverage for uninsuredchildren of working families. Miller-Meeks needed 34 votes - a two-thirds majority - to be confirmed. Hernomination failed on a 28-18 vote Sen. Janet Petersen, D-Des Moines, who opposed Miller-Meeks' confirmation,said the Hawk-I Board needs a person who will stand up for Iowa's families and children, as opposed to someonewho will stand with the Branstad administration.” [Des Moines Register, 4/16/16]AbortionMiller-Meeks Supported A Measure That Increased Penalties For Ending A Woman's PregnancyWithout Her Consent, And Critics Called It Extreme And UnconstitutionalMiller-Meeks Supported A Measure To Define An “Unborn Person” In Iowa Law As Part Of A MeasureIncreasing Penalties For Ending A Woman's Pregnancy Without Her ConsentMiller-Meeks Supported A Measure To Define An “Unborn Person” In Iowa Law As Part Of A MeasureIncreasing Penalties For Ending A Woman's Pregnancy Without Her Consent. “Senate Re

Mariannette Miller-Meeks (IA-02) Memo 2 Dr. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (IA-02) Memo Significant Findings Miller-Meeks supported cutting funding or benefits from Medicare, and proposed ideas that would end Medicare as we know it. Miller-Meeks questioned the need to provide current levels of Medicare benefits if it required increasing taxes, and appeared to support phasing out half of Medicare .