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MARSHALL UNIVERSITYProgram ReviewCOUNSELOR EDUCATIONGraduate School of Education &Professional DevelopmentPrepared by:Dr. Lori EllisonProfessor & Program DirectorOctober 10, 2018

2Counseling Program ReviewMarshall UniversityProgram: Counselor EducationCollege: College of Education and Professional DevelopmentDate of Last Review: April 10, 2017I.ACCREDITATION INFORMATIONa) OrganizationI.NCATE - The Counseling Program is assigned to the Marshall UniversityProfessional Education Unit (PEU). The Professional Education Unit is fullyaccredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education(NCATE).II. CACREP – The Counseling Program has acquired a Certificate of Accreditationfrom the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related EducationalPrograms as of August 1, 2017.b) Date of Most Recent Self-Study and Accreditation VisitI.NCATE - Most recent year program accredited: (include a copy of the letterconferring accreditation.) The most recent NCATE review occurred in October2013. The College of Education is anticipating the next site visit from CAEP (thenew NCATE) in the fall of 2018. The accreditation from CACREP is accepted byCAEP for our school counseling program. COEPD personnel working on the selfstudy have been provided with the necessary information to satisfy CAEP in theirreview of this program.II. CACREP – The 2017 CACREP site visit occurred April 23-26, 2017. TheAccreditation letter and a copy of the certificate are attached to this report. TheCounseling Program will submit an Interim Report to CACREP No later than April1, 2019 addressing the standards mentioned in the decision letter. The CACREPBoard will then assess the completion of these standards and make a decisionregarding accrediting the program for the remaining 6 years of the 8-year cycle.c) Accreditation StatusI.NCATE - (regular, probationary, etc.) The NCATE accreditation review resultedin the continuing accreditation of the PEU through the fall 2018. The PEU passedall six NCATE standards for advanced (graduate) programs.II. CACREP – Two-year Accreditation has been granted to both the SchoolCounseling and Clinical Mental Health Counseling emphasis areas. The program

3standards submitted were deemed “substantially equivalent” to the requiredCACREP standards. The two-year accreditation is given to allow time to addressthe remaining standards that were deemed incomplete (See the decision letter).d) Accrediting Organization’s Report - This should include and most recent action takenby the program’s accrediting body. Also, provide any significant findings from your mostrecent self-study and accreditation visit. If weaknesses or deficiencies were noted,please explain how these are being addressed.I.NCATE - No program deficiencies were noted. A copy of the NCATE report is onfile in the Academic Affairs Office and Board of Governors Office.II. CACREP – The following standards were noted as needing to be completed inthe Interim Report due in April of 2019:a.Standard 3.A – “Provide evidence that the counseling program hasimplemented a plan that ensures all current/future students are/will becovered by individual professional counseling liability insurance policieswhile enrolled in practicum and internship.”1. This has occurred. All students are now submitting proof ofinsurance with their documentation for field experiences inPracticum and Internshipb.Standard 4.B – “Provide evidence that the counselor educationprogram faculty have fully implemented a plan to evaluate the programobjectives that include the following data sources: (1) aggregate studentassessment data that address student knowledge, skills, and professionaldispositions; (2) demographic and other characteristics of applicants,students, and graduates; and (3) data from systematic follow-up studies ofgraduates, site-supervisors, and employers of program graduates.”1. We are approximately 1/3 way through the data gathering process.We have scheduled dates in October, December, and January tocomplete the rest.c.Standard 4.C – “Provide evidence that the counselor educationprogram faculty use program evaluation data to inform programmodifications.1. As we are gathering data, we are assessing the data for indicationsof program changes that need to be made. For example, looking atways to address the deficit found in student performance in theresearch core area on the NCE.d.Standard 4.D – “Provide evidence of the dissemination, andpublication on the program website in an easily accessible location, of anannual report that includes, by program level, (1) a summary of theprogram evaluation results, (2) subsequent program modifications, and (3)any other substantial program changes. In addition, provide evidence thatstudents currently in the program, program faculty, institutionaladministrators, and personnel in cooperating agencies (e.g. employers,site-supervisors) are notified that the report is available.”

41. As soon as the Annual Report is complete and approved, we willupload it to the website along with the information requested in thestandard.e.Standard 4.E – “Provide evidence that the counselor educationprogram faculty annually post on the program’s website in an easilyaccessible location the following specific information for each entry-levelspecialty areas: (1) the number of graduates for the past academic year,(2) pass rates on credentialing examinations, (3) completion rates, and (4)job placement rates.1. This information is posted on the “Accreditation” page on ourwebsite.f. Standard 4.H – “Provide evidence that counselor education programfaculty has implemented a systematic process for the use of individualassessment data in relation to retention, remediation, and dismissal.”1. We have implemented the CSDA and are using it regularly in ourprogram clinical courses. Data are being aggregated and we willbegin analyzing it semester by semester as soon as we have theprocess for aggregation completed. Turnover in the design centerhas made this portion a bit of a challenge.II.CONSISTENCY WITH UNIVERSITY MISSIONProvide your program’s mission and align its elements to those of Marshall Universityand the College using the chart below.Marshall’s MissionCollege’s MissionMarshall University providesinnovative graduateeducation that contributes tothe development of societyand the individual.The mission of theProfessional Education Unitis to prepare exemplaryeducational personnel tomeet the needs of the stateand region.The University activelyfacilitates learning throughthe preservation, discovery,synthesis, and disseminationof knowledge.This mission is advanced byproviding an array ofprograms leading todegrees, licensure, andprofessional development forinitial and advancedcandidates and workingprofessionalsProgram’s Mission 2016forwardThe mission of the MarshallUniversity Counseling Program is toprepare aspiring counselors to servetheir schools andcommunities as ethical, competent,and culturally sensitive practitioners.The program’s mission proceedsthrough providing a robustcurriculum and assessment planthat meet academic standards forboth state licensure and nationalaccreditation.Provide your program’s learning outcomes and show their alignment to those ofMarshall University

5Note: Those objectives listed on the right are the newly developed program objectivesthat are being used to guide program assessment from fall of 2016 forward.Marshall’s Domains ofThinkingCommunication FluencyCreative ThinkingEthical and Civic ThinkingInformation LiteracyInquiry-Based ThinkingIntegrative ThinkingIntercultural ThinkingMetacognitive ThinkingQuantitative ThinkingIII.Degree Program’s Learning Goals/Outcomes (Onegoal/outcome can align with more than one of Marshall’sDomains of Thinking) Academic year 2016-17 forward.PO4: The Counseling Program will prepare students tounderstand, utilize and potentially contribute to the body ofresearch within the counseling profession.PO5: The Counseling Program will encourage studentdevelopment and skill in using assessments, resources, andinterventions for clients relative to mental health, academic,and career development needs.PO5: The Counseling Program will encourage studentdevelopment and skill in using assessments, resources, andinterventions for clients relative to mental health, academic,and career development needs.PO6: The Counseling Program will promote an understandingof human development and self-awareness, wellness, andresilience throughout the lifespan.PO1: The Counseling program will prepare students whorepresent the program and the profession in ethical practice,advocacy, and professional identity.PO4: The Counseling Program will prepare students tounderstand, utilize and potentially contribute to the body ofresearch within the counseling profession.PO4: The Counseling Program will prepare students tounderstand, utilize and potentially contribute to the body ofresearch within the counseling profession.PO1: The Counseling program will prepare students whorepresent the program and the profession in ethical practice,advocacy, and professional identity.PO3: The Counseling Program will prepare students who areskilled in attending, conceptualization, and providinginterventions for individuals, groups and families.PO2: The Counseling Program will provide instruction andopportunity to develop a sense of cultural awareness andsensitivity to underserved populations.PO3: The Counseling Program will prepare students who areskilled in attending, conceptualization, and providinginterventions for individuals, groups and families.PO5: The Counseling Program will encourage studentdevelopment and skill in using assessments, resources, andinterventions for clients relative to mental health, academic,and career development needs.PO4: The Counseling Program will prepare students tounderstand, utilize and potentially contribute to the body ofresearch within the counseling profession.PROGRAM REVISIONS AND CHANGESSince the spring of 2015, the Counseling Program has completed a comprehensiveeffort to obtain national specialty accreditation from the Council for the Accreditation of

6Counseling and Rehabilitation Educational Programs (CACREP). Major revisions to allaspects of the program helped to succeed at this endeavor and we continue to revisepolicies and procedures as the needs seem to indicate. Among those major revisionswere revisions to the admissions process, the addition of a candidacy requirement, thecontinuation of the development of the cohort model used with Pressley Ridge, theaddition of the program to Marshall’s Distance Learning program, and the addition ofboth a comprehensive exam and an option to take the licensure exam on campus priorto graduation. These revisions are now complete and beginning to be fully implementedfor all excepting the Candidacy policy. Some challenges to obtaining the applications forcandidacy have presented themselves and the program is working on a plan tostreamline this process through one of the courses and through aggregated data wehave been tracking through admissions. Ongoing still is the revision of the assessmentplan and its subsequent implementation plan. The progress of this plan is stated abovein the section on accreditation. These data will be gathered and analyzed in anticipationof preparing the interim report that is due to be submitted in April 2019. The Programfaculty hope to have some good information to share in that report.Graduate Program Curriculum - Each student must complete 45 hours of requiredcore coursework, inclusive of an emphasis specific internship, and select a specializedarea of emphasis (Clinical Mental Health Counseling or School Counseling,) whichconsists of 15 -21 hours of required and elective coursework. The School CounselingEmphasis supports an Alternative Certification track which consists of an additional 6hours of coursework for students who do not hold a valid WV Teaching License. Thisfoundation supports the knowledge, skill and understanding developed throughconcentrated study in a specialized area of counseling. The culminating experience forall counseling students is an intensive clinical practicum and clinical internshipexperience which totals 700 clock hours specific to the student’s emphasis. Both clinicalexperiences provide the faculty an opportunity to assess the professional growth anddevelopment of counseling students throughout their degree program.The program objectives reflect current knowledge and positions concerning professionalcounseling and development in a pluralistic society as adopted by the AmericanCounseling Association, American School Counseling Association and reflect thestandard requirements in the 8 core curricular areas required by CACREP (Council forAccreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs). Therefore, thestudent’s overall graduate program of study, personal development, professionaldevelopment and training is based upon a foundation of knowledge and clinicalapplication in the 45 core hours and in their respective specialized area of emphasis.Each emphasis area requires this core of courses that are designed to provide studentswith knowledge and understanding in assessment, career development, counselingtheory, human development, human relations, group work, professional identity, culturaldiversity and clinical application. Students also complete designated specializationcourses that satisfy state curriculum requirements for their respective emphasis areas.Students completing the degree program in Counseling should be able to:

7 think critically, logically and creatively about the counseling profession and aboutserving as a professional counselor within the context of the social, political andeconomic forces which impinge on the counseling profession; demonstrate knowledge and skills needed to practice effectively and ethically inclient services positions in schools, community agencies and institutions of highereducation; demonstrate competency in providing professional services to people from diversecultural backgrounds; understand the history of the counseling profession-including the theories, values,developments and practitioners that have influenced the counseling profession andits current purpose and place in society; communicate effectively, both orally and in writing with respect to their clients, worksetting and other professionals involved in the counseling profession; evaluate the social and psychological influences that help to shape all children,adolescents and adults in conjunction with counseling roles in agencies, school,higher education settings, private practice and other settings; recognize and solve problems in counseling through the use of effective formal andinformal inquiry; utilize, integrate, and demonstrate a basic understanding and application oftechnology in the practice of counseling.Graduate Certificate – The Counseling Program offers the state’s only graduate levelinitiative providing a sequential, specialized professional development opportunity formental health professionals in the area of Violence, Loss and Trauma Counseling(VoLT). The certificate program is designed for current students and workingprofessionals who wish to investigate and, perhaps, contribute to the philosophies,interventions, programming, and/or research regarding the care of those victimized byinterpersonal violence (IPV), complicated bereavement, and/or traumatic experiences.Professional Continuing Education coursework offered in the certificate program will beeligible for continuing education units by the WV Board of Examiners in Counseling.Admission Requirements – It is expected that enrollees of this program willgenerally be engaged in clinical practice or some support aspect of direct clientservice and/or intervention where family violence, bereavement, or trauma havebeen identified or suspected.Admission requirement for the certificate program include the following:

8o Concurrent enrollment in a Master’s degree counseling, social work,psychology, or related field, Oro A Master’s degree in counseling, social work, psychology, or related field, Oro Departmental approval.IV.FACULTYSummarize significant points relating to faculty teaching courses within the major(percentage of faculty holding tenure, extent of use of part-time faculty, level ofacademic preparation, faculty development efforts, books & journal articles, papers &attendance at state, regional and national professional organization meetings). Includepart-time faculty and graduate assistants employed during the final year of this review.There are currently 9 full-time Marshall University faculty serving the CounselingProgram which is assigned to the Graduate School of Education and ProfessionalDevelopment following the retirement of one of our Huntington-based faculty members,Dr. Don Hall, in August, 2017. Four faculty members are now housed in Harris Hall onthe Huntington Campus and five members are housed on the South CharlestonCampus. The faculty is very active in all aspects of counselor education andprofessional development, nationally and regionally. Please see Faculty QualificationsChart below for a summary of professional qualifications and activities for each facultymember for the past three years.V.ADVISINGThe Counseling Program has initiated a more focused approach to student advising.The Program faculty serve as advisors for all program students with the exception ofsome students in the certificate program whose primary program is not Counseling.Program faculty have implemented a process to attend to student needs and queries inas efficient and effective a manner as possible. This process begins with initiatingcontact with advisees on a semester-to-semester basis to insure maximum academicsuccess and professional growth. The advising lists with student contact information,academic plans of study and other relevant advising information in now stored in theprogram-based data bank, which all faculty have ready access to.

9FacultyAndrew BurckHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. in CounselorEducation &SupervisionAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberMental HealthCounselingFaculty RankAssistant ProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsLent, J., Burck, A., & Stretch, L. A. (2016).Practicaand Internship Field Placements UsingCybersupervision. In Goss, K., Anthony, K., Stretch,L., & Nagel, D. (Ed.), (pp. 343-349). New York, NY:Thomas.Teaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 SchoolsLaux, J. M., DuFresne, R. M., Arnekrans, A. K.,Lindinger-Sterart, S., Roseman, C. P.,WertenBerger, A., Calmes, S., Loves, D. W., Burck,A., Schultz, J. (2016). Assessing the Accuracy of theSubstance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3Using DSM-5 Criteria. The Professional Counselor ,6, 121-133.FacultyLisa BurtonHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. in Education2008, CapellaUniversityAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberSchool CounselingFaculty RankAssociate ProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsBurton, L. G., Lent, J. (in press). The use of visionboards as a therapeutic intervention. The Journal ofCreativity in Mental Health , 11.Burton, L. G., N. S., Oral Presentation, AmericanSchool Counselor Association Conference,American School Counselor Association, Denver,CO, "Realizing & Recharging with Vision Boards",Conference, Academic, National, peerreviewed/refereed. (July 11, 2017).Burton, L. G., Rubenstein, R. L., Oral Presentation,Southern Association of Counselor EducatorsConference, Southern Association of CounselorEducators, New Orleans, LA, "School counselor roleconfusion: How counselor educators can betterprepare our students", Conference, Academic, peerreviewed/refereed. (October 8, 2016).Clinical Placement Coordinator, Committee Chair,(August 2015 - Present).Teaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 Schools5 years as aSchoolCounselor ingrades 3-9Coordinator ucation,DropoutPrevention andHomelessEducation for theWVDE for 10years

10Association for Creativity in Counseling ConferenceCommittee, Committee Member (September 2014 Present).FacultyDarlene DanekerHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. in Counselingand CounselorEducation 2002,University of NorthCarolina atGreensboroAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberMental HealthCounselingFaculty RankAssociate ProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsRiley, B. (Co-Principal), Saunders, A. (Principal),Karim, R. (Co-Principal), Daneker, D. P. (CoPrincipal), Miller, B. (Co-Principal), Smith, A. (CoPrincipal), Elkins, N. S. (Co-Principal), Koontz, P. L.(Co-Principal), Sawhney, M. (Co-Principal), Gottlieb,J. D. (Co-Principal), Saunders, E. (Co-Principal),Grant, "Marshall University SBIRT", SAMSHA,Federal, 931,594.00, Funded. (August 2015 Present).Teaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 SchoolsDaneker, D. P., Lecture, West Virginia CounselingAssociation, WVCA, Glade Springs, WV,"Counseling Transgender clients", Conference, NonAcademic, State, Accepted. (November 11, 2016).Daneker, D. P. (Presenter & Author), Lecture, WestVirginia Counseling Association, Glade Springs WV,"Clinical Issues working with Transgendered",Conference, Academic, State, Invited. (November 4,2016).FacultyLori EllisonHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. Counseling2007, Texas A&MUniversity-CommerceAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberMental HealthCounselingFaculty RankProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsScholarship:Ellison, L. L. (2018, July (3rd Quarter/Summer)).Introducing neurocounseling into counselingclasses: Getting our feet wet together. CounselingToday.Ellison, L. L. (in press). The Mine of the Mind. InMetaphors and Therapy (2nd Ed.) S. Spencer andC. Dean (Ed.) Baton Rouge, LA: IndependentTherapy Ink.Teaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 Schools

11Ellison, L. L., Oral Presentation, SouthernAssociation of Counselor Education and SupervisionConference, SACES, Myrtle Beach, SC, "TeachingMentoring/Mentoring Teaching: Collaborating inCounselor Education to Facilitate ProfessionalGrowth", Conference, Academic, Regional, peerreviewed/refereed, Accepted. (October 13, 2018).Ellison, L. L., Oral Presentation, SouthernAssociation of Counselor Education and SupervisionConference, SACES, Myrtle Beach, SC, "You wantme to teach what? Meeting the challenge of infusingtrauma-informed methods across the curriculum",Conference, Academic, Regional, peerreviewed/refereed, Accepted. (October 13, 2018).Ellison, L. L., Oral Presentation, WV LicensedProfessional Counseling Association AnnualConference, WVLPCA, Morgantown, WV,"Managing the menagerie: Understanding andconceptualizing your supervisees", Conference,Academic, State, published elsewhere, Invited.(April 17, 2018).Leadership: Treasurer – American Association ofState Counseling BoardsService: Board Chair - WV Board of Examiners inCounseling. Disaster Mental Health Volunteer forAmerican Red Cross.FacultyJeffery GarrettHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. in CounselorEducation 2004 OhioUniversityAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberMental HealthCounselingMarriage, Couple, &Family CounselingFaculty RankAssociate ProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsLucas-Adkins, C. (Supporting), Linz, M. F. (CoPrincipal), Saunders, A. (Co-Principal), O'Connell, L.(Co-Principal), Miryala, K. (Supporting), Garrett, J.W. (Supporting), Linz, T. D. (Supporting), Canady,B. (Supporting), Koontz, P. L. (Supporting), Grant,"Behavioral Health Workforce Education andTraining Program Grant", Federal, 213,568.00,Funded. (September 11, 2017 - Present).Smith, C. M. M. (Panelist), Garrett, J. W. (Panelist),Other, Counselors' Roles in the Opioid Epidemic,American Counseling Association, SouthTeaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 Schools

12Charleston, WV, "How Counselors Can Help Fightthe Opioid Epidemic", Panel, Non-Academic,National, Invited. (November 14, 2017).FacultyDavid HermonHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. in CounselorEducation 1995, OhioUniversityAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberMental HealthCounselingFaculty RankProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsHermon, D. A., Lent, J., Oral Presentation, TheSouthern Association for Counselor Education andSupervision Conference, Southern Association forCounselor Education and Supervision, MyrtleBeach, SC, "Finding Fit: Work-Life Balance inCounselor Education", Conference, Academic,Regional, peer-reviewed/refereed, Accepted.(October 12, 2018).Teaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 SchoolsLent, J. (Presenter & Author), Hermon, D. A.(Presenter & Author), Lecture, Association forCounselor Education and Supervision (ACES)Conference, Association for Counselor Educationand Supervision (ACES), Chicago, IL, "ProvidingWellness Instruction for Counselors-In-Training",Roundtable, Academic, National, peerreviewed/refereed, published in proceedings,Accepted. (October 11, 2017).FacultyJonathan LentHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. in CounselorEducation 2004 OhioUniversityAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberSchool CounselingFaculty RankAssociate ProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsLent, J., Burck, A., & Stretch, L. A. (2016). Practicaand Internship Field Placements UsingCybersupervision. In Goss, K., Anthony, K., Stretch,L., & Nagel, D. (Ed.), (pp. 343-349). New York, NY:Thomas.Hermon, D., & Lent, J. (2012). Transition fromcareer to retirement: A psychoeducational groupdesign. Career Planning and Adult DevelopmentJournal, 28, 33-44.Burton, L. G., Lent, J. (in press). The use of visionTeaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 SchoolsHigh SchoolCounselor2006 – 2007ElementarySchoolCounselor2006 – 2007

13boards as a therapeutic intervention. The Journal ofCreativity in Mental Health , 11.FacultyRobert RubensteinHighest Degree Field& UniversityEd.D. in Counseling1989, West VirginiaUniversityAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberProgram Director &Coordinator of SchoolCounseling EmphasisFaculty RankProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsBurton, L. (Chair), Oral Presentation, AnnualConference, Southern Association of CounselorEducation and Supervision, New Orleans LA, "RoleConfusion and Role Diffusion of School CounselorsStrategies for Faculty and Students". (October 9,2016).Teaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 Schools13.5 years ofpublic schoolexperience as ateacher,counselor andadministratorRubenstein, R. L., Oral Presentation, LeadershipRetreat, WVDOC, Canaan Valley, "Leadership andGestalt". (April 12, 2016).Rubenstein, R. L., Oral Presentation, WV Countyand Municipalities Business Directors, WV CountyOfficials Association, Embassy Suites, Charleston,WV, "Overcoming Adversity in Leadership",Conference, Non-Academic, State, Invited. (October4 , 2015).FacultyCarol SmithHighest Degree Field& UniversityPh.D. in CounselorEducation 2002, KentState UniversityAssignment:Indicated the Role ofthe Faculty MemberMental HealthCounselingFaculty RankAssociate ProfessorTenureTrack(Yes/No)YScholarship, Leadership in ProfessionalAssociations and Service:List up to three major contributionsin the past three yearsSmith, C. M. M. (2017). Neurobiological Effects ofTrauma After Disasters. In Jane Webber and BarryMascari (Ed.), (4th ed., pp. Chapter 3: How theBrain and Body Change After A Disaster).Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.Smith, C. M. M., Webber, J. M., Mascari, J. B.,Kitzinger, R., Runte, J. K. (in press). TraumatologyTrends: A Content Analysis of Three CounselingJournals 1994-2014. Journal of Counseling andDevelopment.National Leadership Team, Trauma InterestNetwork, American Counseling Association.Teaching orOtherProfessionalExperience inP-12 Schools

14(March 2012 to present).

15STUDENTSEntrance Standards - Describe the admission standards and procedures employed formaking the admission decision. (GPA, ACT, other tests).Fall 2016 standardsAdmission RequirementsAdmission to the Counseling Program is selective and competitive. Admission decisions for allprogram applicants are rooted in the specific standards of the Marshall University Graduate College andthe minimum standards of the Counseling program. Students are admitted to an area of emphasis andmust indicate their preferences during the admission application process.Graduate CollegeApplicants should follow the admissions process described in this catalog or at the GraduateAdmissions website at www. admission.Counseling ProgramMultiple criteria are used in making decisions to admit students to the degree program. Eachapplicant is evaluated using the following criteria (all material should be submitted directly to GraduateAdmissions):1) A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution.2) Evidence of academic aptitude for graduate-level study that includes at least one of thefollowing:a) A 2.75 overall Undergraduate GPA or higher on a 4.0 scale for all previouslycompleted undergraduate courses.b) A Graduate GPA of 3.0 on any previously completed advanced degree.c) GRE sco

II. CACREP - The 2017 CACREP si te visit occurred April 23-26, 2017. The Accreditation letter and a copy of the certificate are attached to this report. The Counseling Program will submit an Interim Report to CACREP No later than April 1, 2019 addressing the standards mentioned in the decision letter. The CACREP