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Johnson UniversitySchool of Social and Behavioral SciencesGraduate Counseling Program2016-2017Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)Master of Arts in CounselingConcentration in Clinical Mental Health CounselingandConcentration in School CounselingRev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 1 of 26

Table of Contents (TOC)Comprehensive Assessment Report 2016-2017Evidence-Based Program Improvement. 3. 32016-2017 Summary of Program Meetings. 32016-2017 Counseling Program Review (CPR) Narrative . 4Appendix A: Summary of Assessment Points (2016-2017) . 11Appendix B: 2016-2017 Brief Stats. 12Appendix C: Revised Program and Concentration SLOs . 13Appendix D: Mapping of KPIs with SLOs and Courses . 14Appendix E: Counselor Dispositions Evaluation Form . 16Appendix F: Assessment of Student Learning (CMHC) . 18Appendix G: Assessment of Student Learning (School Counseling) . 22Appendix H: Closing the 2015-2016 Assessment Loop . 26Rev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 2 of 26

Comprehensive Assessment Report 2016-2017[return to TOC]Over the past several years, Johnson University has responded to the challenge of implementingformalized and strategic program evaluation. Additionally, in accordance with CACREPrequirements, the graduate counseling program at Johnson University has developed aComprehensive Assessment Plan (CAP), formalized during the 2014-2015 academic year (in theprocess of revision during 2017-2018). The CAP describes a continuous, cyclical process that isparticipative, flexible, relevant, and responsive. The heart of the CAP is to ensure studentsgraduate from their respective program as professionally competent school counselors, clinicalmental health counselors, and marriage and family counselors.The CAP is reviewed annually and revised asnecessary to ensure effective assessment isoccurring and to maximize quality of studentlearning; it is a work in progress. This planinforms a Comprehensive Assessment Report(CAR) used by the faculty to demonstratehow assessment results are used to monitorand enhance the development ofprofessionally competent counselors. TheCAR is made available to the public via theuniversity’s Office of InstitutionalEffectiveness website.Evidence-Based Program Improvement[return to TOC]The CAP describes the intention of the faculty to systematically gather evidence and data,comparing this data to program goals and student learning outcomes to make needed adjustmentsand changes. Program faculty also review current professional literature and state licensurestandards to inform program changes. Core and adjunct faculty have a shared responsibility inexamining data, suggesting potential courses of action and implementing needed changes. Fulltime Core Counseling Faculty (CCF) typically meet weekly during the academic year forprogram evaluation and improvement discussion. Additionally, the CCF conduct an annualCounseling Program Review (CPR) during the fall semester following an academic school year.2016-2017 Summary of Program Meetings[return to TOC]The Core Counseling Faculty (CCF), comprised of 3 fulltime faculty members met weekly for30 scheduled and documented meetings from June 2016-April 2017. One faculty member wason part-time sabbatical during the school year. Meeting times predominately focused onindividual student concerns, as well as program review and improvement. During January, 2017,CCF spent over 10 hours discussing CACREP 2016 standards and developing KPIs andcounselor dispositions. Simultaneously, the CCF revised existing SLOs in order to meetRev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 3 of 26

institutional shifts in assessment reporting procedures. Over the course of the spring semester,the process of updating syllabi began in order to ensure new SLOs, KPIs and counselordispositions were integrated appropriately. The CCF met on 8/11/17 for the annual CounselingProgram Review (CPR) in order to discuss assessment results from 2016-2017 academic year.2016-2017 Counseling Program Review (CPR) Narrative[return to TOC]1. Review of Program Mission & Student Learning Outcomesa. Program Missioni. Review(a) Nothing changed regarding program mission during 2016-2017ii. Action Plan1. No action required at this time. Concentrations continue to be a good fit for themission and for the programb. Goals and Student Learning Outcomesi. Review1. CMHC concentration(a) All SLO’s were above the 86.00 benchmark with SLO 3.3 the lowest at 93.21(i) (see Appendix F: Assessment of Student Learning (CMHC))2. School Counseling concentration(a) All SLO’s were above the 86.00 benchmark with SLO 2.2 the lowest at 90.31(i) (see Appendix G: Assessment of Student Learning (School Counseling))3. 2016 CACREP Standards(a) During the spring of 2017, the Core Counseling Faculty redesigned SLOs (seeAppendix C: Revised Program and Concentration SLOs) and identified bothKPIs (see Appendix D: Mapping of KPIs with SLOs and Courses) andCounselor Dispositions (see Appendix E: Counselor Dispositions EvaluationForm) in accordance with the 2016 CACREP standards(b) In addition, faculty began preparations for adding additional coursework tothe School Counseling concentration resulting in a 60hr plan of study(c) The CCF also adjusted the CMHC concentration resulting in a 63hr plan ofstudy instead of 62hr (effective 2018-2019 academic year)ii. Action Plan1. CACREP 2016 standards and associated KPIs and counselor dispositions will beimplemented beginning 2017-2018 academic year. Students who were admittedprior to January 2017 will continue under 2009 standards2. School Counseling concentration 60hr plan of study will continue to be finalizedwith likely implementation 2018-2019 academic year3. Faculty will update the Comprehensive Assessment Plan to ensure that allnecessary changes have been made to accommodate redesigned SLOs, along withthe introduction of KPIs and counselor dispositions4. As dispositional and KPI data are collected, the faculty will continue to monitorfor any needed changes2. Program Assessmenta. Direct Evidencei. Course Grades and SCRs1. ReviewRev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 4 of 26

(a) Eight students were identified as being below standard in 1 or morecompetencies(i) A remediation plan was provided for each student identified as belowstandard(ii) All plans were successfully completed and competency was demonstratedby each student.(b) Observed some inconsistencies in closing the loop on remediation plan andreporting progress for each student(c) Concerns raised over students who receive more than 1 “below competency”2. Action Plan(a) Faculty to be more alert in reporting students identified below standard and toensure that students are compliant with remediation plans and that this isreported in a timely manner to the program director(b) Related to course grades and SCRs, program faculty will work to be moreconsistent with issuing Notices of Concern, an early warning system internalto the program, intended to catch issues proactively (dispositional, academic,or otherwise).ii. Skills Data1. Review(a) COUN5581 Counseling Skills & Techniques Review(i) This introductory course is used as a gateway to students beginningpracticum(ii) Ten students attended COUN5581 Summer 2016(iii)All students were “good” or “excellent” in the passing of competencies(b) Practicum(i) Six students successfully completed CMHC practicum during the fallsemester and one during the spring(ii) No students were enrolled in SC practicum(c) Internship(i) Eight students successfully passed CMHC internship in the summer with a“B” or better grade.(ii) Seven students passed CMHC internship in the fall with a "B" or bettergrade. One student failed internship.(iii)Thirteen students passed CMHC internship in the spring with a "B" orbetter grade. Six students graduated in April commencement and 1 inAugust. Any required remediation was reported above (see 2.a.i.1.)(iv) No SC interns were enrolled during the 2016-2017 school year2. Action Plan(a) COUN5581 appears to be functioning well as a way of assessing skill levelsand as a tool to ensure students are prepared to begin practicum(b) Faculty will consider making COUN5581 a 2-credit hour course instead of 1due to the extensive work expected of students (to begin 2018-2019)(c) Faculty were pleased with the “rolling internship” and will continuemonitoring it closely during 2017-2018 school year(d) Beginning 2017-2018, CCF group supervisor will provide a supervisionevaluation on each CMHC student who is in an off-campus placement.Rev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 5 of 26

(e) As the program moves to CACREP 2016 standards, faculty will be looking atthe Counselor Competencies Scale—Revised (CCS-R) and use it to helpdetermine competencies for 2017-2018 and forward. This will apply to bothCMHC and School Counseling students.iii. Standardized Tests-CPCE & Professional School Counselor (PSC) Praxis1. Review(a) Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE): Eight studentscompleted the exam and passed on first attempt (passing 69)(i) The group mean was 94.00 compared with national mean of 85.37(ii) Group range 85-115, standard deviation 10.39(iii)Areas of possible weakness:1. Three students scored below the mean in Diversity (three male)2. Three students scored below the mean in Assessment3. Two students scored below the mean in Professional orientation/ethics4. Two students scored below the mean in Career5. Three of the lowest scores were male students(iv) Areas of possible strength:1. Four students scored above the mean in Research2. Two students scored above the mean in Group3. Three students scored above the mean in Human Development4. Two students scored above the mean in Diversity(b) Since inception, the SC concentration has maintained a 100% passing rate onthe Praxis with an average of 168.13(i) For 2016-2017, there were no students who took the exam as no SCstudents completed internship during this academic year2. Action Plan(a) Both standardized exams (PSC Praxis & CPCE) allow for comparison withother similar programs(b) Faculty were pleased that the group mean on the CPCE had risen for a 3rd yearin a row and continued to be well above the national mean.(c) Faculty were somewhat concerned that 3 students were below the mean inAssessment but also noted that it is common for that to be an issue. Sincealumni surveys also indicated “assessments” as an area of improvement,faculty will monitor this closely(d) Faculty noted anomaly in diversity (male/female) scores. Males seemed to beperforming overall below females. Faculty will continue to monitor this(e) Faculty will continue to use both the PSC Praxis and the CPCE(f) In the future, the CPCE will be required of SC concentration as well asCMHCiv. Oral Exam1. Review(a) Eight students passed oral exams (passing 83.5%)Rev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 6 of 26

(b) Seven students passed initially and 1 remaining student passed upon secondattempt(c) The group mean was 92.86. The group range was 88.20-96.74(d) Faculty observed a very slight downward trend in group mean past 3 years2. Action Plan(a) Faculty will explore possibilities of increasing emphasis on thorough casepresentations during internship in order to build more expertise andconfidence in students so they are better prepared for oral examsb. Indirect Evidencei. Alumni Survey (Spring 2017)1. Review(a) 15 respondents (13 CMHC & 2 SC)(b) 12 respondents were female and 3 were male(c) 6 respondents were licensed as LMFT, 2 were licensed as PC and 1respondent had obtained a supervisor certification(d) 6 respondents attempted and passed licensure exams on first attempt,(e) 1 respondent attempted licensure exam and did not pass(f) 11 of 15 were employed in the counseling field (73%)(g) Identified Strengths of the Program(i) Having live supervision and a counseling center to practice in(ii) The faculty are a strength(iii)Emphasis on “Self of Therapist”(h) Areas for Possible Growth(i) Expand research methodology and training(ii) Improve agency work for practicum & internships(iii)Improve School Counseling concentration2. Action Plan(a) Send surveys to only previous 5 years of graduates and try to increaseresponse level(b) Continue to improve communications between program faculty and offcampus internship sites(c) Review writing and research course to consider areas for improvementii. Supervisor-Employer Survey (Spring 2017)1. Review(a) 6 respondents (internship supervisors, no employers)(b) Identified Strengths of the Program(i) When asked if a position were open, 4 stated they would hire the JohnsonUniversity graduate student who interned for them(ii) Responses from all 6 indicated that “Counseling Skills” was the greatestarea of strength (66.7%), “Appreciate and Respect for Diversity” (50%),and “Self-of-therapist” (50%)(c) Areas for Possible Growth(i) Systems theory, especially Bowen(ii) Confronting in Therapy Sessions(iii)Improving Diagnosis, Treatment Planning, & Case Conceptualization2. Action PlanRev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 7 of 26

iii.iv.v.vi.Rev. 9/12/17(a) Work on ways to improve response rate, especially from employers(b) Increase emphasis on diagnosis, treatment planning and caseconceptualization within practicum and internshipGraduate Program Satisfaction Survey (Spring 2017)1. Review(a) 2 respondents, 1 dual enrollment(b) Identified strengths of program(i) Live supervision(ii) Faculty(c) Identified concerns(i) “I would HIGHLY recommend not allowing a two-year track2. Action Plan(a) Consider ways of improving student response rate or other options ongathering data(b) Continue to encourage applicants and new students to consider tracks that areat least 3 years of duration rather than 2 or even 2.5 yearsExit Interview1. Review(a) During the 2016-2017 year, the decision was made to discontinue the exitinterview and student focus groups. Action Plan(b) Core Counseling Faculty will continue to examine the best way to gain thisdata2. Action Plan(a) At present, all graduate students (both admitted to the program as well as dualenrollment and non-degree seeking) are invited to take a Program SatisfactionSurvey each spring (see above)Field Placement Data1. Review(a) Data absent for 2016-2017(b) Discussion on value of Field Placement Data2. Action Plan(a) Will continue discussion and options in 2017-2018 academic yearInstitutional Data1. Review(a) According to the Admissions Office, 32 individuals applied to the graduatecounseling program(i) 17 completed applications(ii) 16 applicants were accepted into the program (94.1% of completed files)(iii)1 male applicant, the rest were female(iv) 1 applicant was denied (5.9% of completed files)(v) 13 students enrolled in the program (76.5% of completed files, 81.3% ofaccepted applicants)1. Ten of the 13 students enrolled in CMHC concentration2. Three of the 13 students enrolled in SC concentration3. One existing CMHC student began SC concentration as well (summer2017)Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 8 of 26

(vi) 3 individuals were accepted but did not enroll in the program or havedelayed enrollment (17.6% of all applicants, 18.8% of acceptedapplicants)(b) One student was dismissed from the program during the 2016-2017 schoolyear2. Action Plan(a) Continue to work on integrating dispositions (2016 Standards) and thendevelop comprehensive tracking system that begins at admission – creatingfeedback loop to inform admission processes as well as retention efforts(b) Consider ways of increasing numbers of male applicants3. Yellow-pad Notesa. The CCF typically meet weekly during the fall and spring semesters of each academicyear. While much of the meeting involves review of assessment related material, there isalso a significant portion of each meeting that is less structured and at times moreserendipitous discussions and program dreamingb. In an effort to capture this less structured portion of each meeting, CCF developed“yellow-pad notes” as a way of documenting and tracking information from thesediscussionsc. Review 2016-2017 notesi. Weighted Applicant Rubric1. Continuing to improve the rubric each year especially with the addition ofcounselor dispositionsii. Off-campus internship placements1. Any changes to policy would need to be in the handbook or in a syllabus2. Use of Counselor Dispositions(a) Should mid-term Practicum evaluations include dispositions especially in lightof off-campus internship placements(b) Practicum supervisors will be requested to do a mid-term evaluation thatincludes dispositions this year (Fall 2017) as part of the testing phase of use ofcounselor dispositionsiii. Need to develop a deferment/re-enroll/re-apply policy1. Some students who were accepted for 2017-2018 were “deferred” startup until2018. Question: Should we allow applicants to defer entrance in to the programonce admitted or should they have to re-apply?(a) The concentrations only have a finite number of “spots” available andreserving some spots for applicants who have deferred means less studentscan be accepted in subsequent years(b) Accepted applicants probably need to at the very least complete Orientationclass for the semester they are admitted2. ACTION: CCF will discuss options with Registrar’s office about reenrollment/re-application policyiv. Course Rotation/Structure1. Modifications seem to be going well so far but needed to tweak programs of studyso that students who were on various plans were able to be maximally preparedfor the rigors of the program as well as prepared for practicum and internshipRev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 9 of 26

(a) Observation that within a 1-year period, there has been a dramatic shiftingfrom students who predominately chose 2 or 2.5-year plans of study to 3 yearsor even more.(i) This change is likely healthier in many ways, but also creates some uniqueproblems including the lessening of a cohort/community structure and adiminishing of “mentoring” that used to occur from “2nd year students” to“1st year students.”(ii) ACTION: CCF will continue to monitor this development and willbecome more intentional in efforts to build community and encourage thepassing on of information between “old-salts” and “newbies” within thestudent body.(b) Observation that further tweaking “rules of thumb” need to be establishedwith Individual Programs of Study in part to accommodate increasingnumbers of students opting for 3 years and in part to address move to 60credit hour School Counseling concentration and 63 credit hour CMHCconcentration(i) ACTION: Develop several templates for both SC & CMHC that allow for3 options(ii) Reminders to CCF advisors1. COUN 5220, Social & Cultural Diversity must be taken prior to orconcurrently with Human Sexuality.2. If students are taking 6 hours during their first fall semester, theyshould take Group and Ethics.3. If students are taking 9 hours during their first fall semester, theyshould take Group, Ethics, and one Theories course.4. Theories must be taken before or concurrently with Practicum - butbefore whenever reasonably possible.Rev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 10 of 26

Appendix A: Summary of Assessment Points (2016-2017)AdmissionsScreeningAdmissionsInterview DayStudentCompetencyRecord (SCR)COUN5581Coun Skills &Techniques[return to TOC] Fourteen individuals applied for the CMHC concentration and 3 individuals applied for the School Counseling concentration Following a review of admission material (GRE/MAT, GPA, Writing Sample, References), 14 CMHC applicants and 3 SC applicantswere invited to attend an interview day Seventeen applicants (including 3 SC applicants) attended one of two interview days (fall or spring) CMHC concentration: 13 offered admissions, 10 enrolled (3 elected to delay enrollment) SC concentration: 3 offered admission and 3 students enrolled. Additionally, 1 existing CMHC student became dual enrolled The majority of students were considered competent in all their coursework, practicum, and internship experiences There were 8 students who were identified as being below standard in 1 or more areas Remediation plans were provided for each student identified as below standard in a given competency All plans were successfully completed within the 60-day time frame and competency was demonstrated by each student SCR records were compiled and used to inform the Assessment of Student Learning for both the CMHC and SC concentrations (see attachment) Ten students attended COUN5581 summer 2016 All students passed all competencies with a "good" or better evaluation Seven students successfully completed CMHC practicum No students were enrolled in SC practicumPracticum Seven students were enrolled and passed CMHC internship in the fall, 13 students passed CMHC internship in the spring, one intern was dismissed No students were enrolled in SC internshpInternshipStandardizedAssessment/ExamOral ExamAlumniFollow-upRev. 9/12/17 Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE): Eight students completed the exam and passed on first attempt (passing 69). (i) The groupmean was 94.00 compared with national mean of 85.37. Group range 85-111. School Guidance and Counseling Praxis: No student took the PSC Praxis during 2016-2017 academic year. Since inception, the SC concentration hasmaintained a 100% passing rate on the Praxis with an average of 168.13 Eight students passed oral exams including 1 SC concentration student (passing 83.5%). Seven students passed initially and 1 remaining studentspassed upon second attempt The group mean was 92.86. The group range was 88.20-96.74 Survey included alumni from past 6 years. Seventy-three percent of respondents (n 15) were employed in the counseling field, 2 respondentsidentified themselves as School Counselors Six respondents took licensure exams and passed, one attempted but failed to pass Six respondents obtained LMFT license. Two obtained LPC license, One obtained a supervisor certification.Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 11 of 26

Appendix B: 2016-2017 Brief Stats[return to TOC]Completion Data (CMHC)—Avg. 2.12yrs*Completion Data (School Counseling)—Avg. ompletionRate*2011707 (2013)0100.00%2012201387404 (2014)7 (2015)0050.00%100.00%2012201324101 (2014)4 (2015)0050.00%100.00%201412110 (2016)091.70%201421**1 (2016)0100.00%201510**17 (2017)201620178101(2018)(2019)3pending20150n/an/a (2017)n/an/a7pendingpending2016201724 0(2018)(2019)2pendingpendingRemain CompletionEnrolledRate**Students have 2-5 years to complete the program of studyCohort**1 student transferred to CMHC concentration 2015 1 student began dual enrollment CMHC & SCCounselor Preparation ComprehensiveExam (CPCE) pass rateOral Exam pass rate(CMHC & School Counseling)Fall 2016-Spring 2017Johnson CPCE ResultsFall 2016-Spring 2017Mean92.86MeanRange94.00, sd 10.39R 85-115, n 8MaxMin96.7488.20# passed8 of 8 passed on first try# passed8 of 8 passed on firsttryNational CPCE ResultsMean85.37, sd 16.66RangeR 41-123, n 740Job Placement Rate (graduation year)Obtained employment within 3 months after graduationObtained employment within 1 year after graduationRev. 9/12/172016 grads80%90%2017 grads100%n/aComprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 12 of 26

Appendix C: Revised Program and Concentration SLOs[return to TOC]MA in Counseling Core (proposed changes for 2017-2018)SLO 1: Graduates will embrace a Christian worldview that compels them to respectfully and ethically engageclients both similar to and different from themselves.Objective 1.1: Graduates demonstrate conduct consistent with professional standards and ethics.Objective 1.2: Graduates articulate a personal model of applied integration.Objective 1.3: Graduates develop culturally responsive strategies to engage clients in diverse settings.SLO 2: Graduates will synthesize a systemic approach, theoretical understanding, and helping skills to addresshuman experience across the lifespan.Objective 2.1: Graduates discover and apply the interrelationships among and between work,relationships, mental well-being, life roles, and other factors.Objective 2.2: Graduates discover and apply group dynamics, theories, and techniques.Objective 2.3: Graduates demonstrate basic helping skills and techniques.Objective 2.4: Graduates develop a systemic framework for understanding theories and developmentaland non-normative factors that affect human growth and development.SLO 3: Graduates will demonstrate responsible use of research and assessment tools.Objective 3.1: Graduates conduct appropriate assessment of clients using validated tools and proceduresrelevant to the context.Objective 3.2: Graduates evaluate counseling literature and effectively employ research to informcounseling practice.Clinical Mental Health Counseling Concentration (proposed changes for 2017-2018)SLO 4-CMHC: Graduates will competently counsel, informed by knowledge and professional best practices.Objective 4.1-CMHC: Graduates demonstrate a well-formed, systemically-oriented clinical mental healthcounselor identity.Objective 4.2-CMHC: Graduates conceptualize and plan treatment and interventions within a clinicalsetting.Objective 4.3-CMHC: Graduates employ a variety of counseling skills and modalities as they engage clientsin counseling.School Counseling Concentration (proposed changes for 2017-2018)SLO 5-SC: Graduates will competently counsel, informed by knowledge and professional best practices.Objective 5.1-SC: Graduates demonstrate a well-formed school counselor identity.Objective 5.2-SC: Graduates conceptualize and plan lessons/interventions within a school counselingcontext.Objective 5.3-SC: Graduates employ a variety of counseling skills and modalities as they engage studentsin a school counseling setting.Rev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 13 of 26

Appendix D: Mapping of KPIs with SLOs and Courses[return to TOC]SLO 1: Graduates will embrace a Christian worldview that compels them to respectfully and ethically engage clients both similar to and different from themselves.1.1: Graduates demonstrate conduct consistent with professional standards and ethics.COUN 5210 – Ethical & Professional Issues in CounselingPracticum/Internships1.2 Graduates articulate a personal model of applied integrationCOUN 5210 – Ethical & Professional Issues in CounselingCOUN 5330 – Human Development Over the LifespanCOUN 5420 – Theories of Counseling & MFT IICOUN 5200 – Integrating Theology & Therapy Ethical Code/Association Comparative PaperReflection on attending conferenceCPCE Subscore TBD – assignment related to Stone & Duke, How ToThink TheologicallySpiritual Development PaperTheory of Counseling PaperSpecial Topics PaperIntegrative Paper 1.3: Graduates develop culturally responsive strategies to engage clients in diverse settings.COUN 5220 – Social & Cultural Diversity in Counseling Book ReviewInternship CPCE SubscoreSLO 2: Graduates will synthesize a systemic approach, theoretical understanding, and helping skills to address human experience across the lifespan.2.1: Graduates discover and apply the interrelationships among and between work, relationships, mental well-being, life roles, and other factors.COUN 5560 – Career Assessment & Development Class Presentation Career Chaos ProjectsInternship CPCE Subscore2.2: Graduates discover and apply group dynamics, theories, and techniques.COUN 5540 – Group Dynamics/Theories/ Techniques Cumulative Score of 5 Reflection Papers Competent Group Facilitator Paper Final ExamInternship CPCE Subscore2.3: Graduates demonstrate basic helping skills and techniques.COUN 5581 – Counseling Skills & Techniques Video Reviews Counseling Competency ScalesPracticum/Internships Counseling Skills Domain Evaluations CPCE Subscore2.4: Graduates develop a systemic framework for understanding theories and developmental and non-normative factors that affect human growth anddevelopment.COUN 5330 – Human Development Over the Lifespan Final ExamRev. 9/12/17Comprehensive Assessment Report (CAR)-Johnson University Graduate Counseling ProgramPage 14 of 26

Internship CPCE SubscoreSLO 3: Graduates will demonstrate responsible use of research and assessment tools.3.1: Graduates conduct appropriate assessment of clie

1. CACREP 2016 standards and associated KPIs and counselor dispositions will be implemented beginning 2017-2018 academic year. Students who were admitted prior to January 2017 will continue under 2009 standards 2. School Counseling concentration 60hr plan of study will continue to be finalized with likely implementation 2018-2019 academic year 3.