Transcription

Vladimir BarskyA Modern Guide toCheckmating PatternsImprove Your Ability to Spot Typical MatesNew In Chess 2020

ContentsExplanation of symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7Chapter 1The rook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17Chapter 2The queen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Chapter 3The minor pieces and pawns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52Chapter 4Two rooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67Chapter 5Rook and bishop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83Chapter 6Rook and knight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101Chapter 7Queen and bishop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128Chapter 8Queen and knight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150Chapter 9Queen and rook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171Chapter 10 Three pieces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195Chapter 11Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2065

FOREWORDIn the footsteps of The Last CheckThis book is dedicated to the fond memory of Viktor Lvovich Khenkin.The idea for this book first arose about ten years ago, when I edited ViktorLvovich Khenkin’s classic textbook The Last Check. I was surprised that hisoriginal methodology for finding mating combinations did not generallyreceive serious attention. Maybe this was because Viktor Lvovich’s pasttraining achievements had been forgotten? After all, he taught chess at thenow rebuilt and renamed young pioneer stadium, and was trainer of theMoscow junior team, which was victorious in All-Union championships.In addition, Khenkin the theoretician was one of the founders of theSozin Attack and wrote a whole chapter in Yuri Averbakh’s famous fivevolume endgame course.In the great majority of books devoted to chess tactics, combinationsare categorized by theme: double attack, deflection, attraction, overload,discovered attack, line-opening, etc. But how are you supposed to know,when sitting at the board with the clock ticking, what you should belooking for, whether a fork, a deflection, a line-opening, etc.? In practice,everything usually happens the other way round: first the player finds acombinational motif, using his experience and the associations thereof,and then works out how to effect it correctly. Only after the idea has beenrealized does the happy victor think about which tactical device he used.Viktor Khenkin tried to make his method as close as possible topractical play. Here is an extract from Mikhail Tal’s preface to TheLast Check: ‘When I examine a concrete position, I notice first of allits particular characteristic, the mutual piece placements, and theirconnections. And suddenly (in the majority of cases this happensintuitively) the outlines of some new position will flash up, tantalizingand attractive. It is not yet on the board, of course, but all the signs arethat it could arise. Then the chase for the bird begins. Often, calculatingthe variations is a Sisyphean task. The position in the mind’s eye is almostimpossible to reach, even if the opponent enters into “cooperation” withyou. Some piece is on the wrong square, some pawn gets in the way.but sometimes a tedious search of variations brings real results. Moveby move, one approaches the desired final position, which one saw fromafar. And if the circle of variations is closed, then. then you can start acombination.’7

A Modern Guide to Checkmating PatternsThe remarkable trainer and Soviet Master of Sport, Viktor LvovichKhenkin (1923-2010), proposed systematizing mating schemes or‘pictures’ by reference to the piece or pawn which brought the mate to itsconclusion. It turned out that there were not so many of these schemes– about a hundred basic ones – and only about 20-30 which occur in thegreat majority of mating combinations. These can be remembered evenby an inexperienced player: ‘it’s not rocket science’, as the popular sayingruns.Luck brought me a long acquaintance with Viktor Lvovich Khenkin.At the start of the millennium, he was the mentor and senior comrade ofvarious young journalists: Oleg Pervakov, Maxim Notkin, Ilya Odessky,Andrey Paneyakh and the present author. We tried to learn from theMaestro all the best. A workaholic, he did not tolerate hack-work orroutine stuff, and he perfectly mastered the literary Russian language.And the non-literary too: oh, how he cursed, when I wrote ‘pieces of iron’instead of ‘piece of iron’ in one title he proposed! He constantly repeatedto us: ‘Do not dismiss small things, trifles are the most important, theycreate an image!’ The children of Twitter and Instagram are unlikely toappreciate it, but how many hours we spent on coming up with a sharpheadline even for articles of second-rate importance, not to mention reallytop-class ones. They were great hours of creative search!I am proud of the fact that I wrote my first book, dedicated to theFrenchman François Philidor, in co-authorship with Viktor Lvovich.Then I helped re-issue 1000 Checkmate Combinations as the special editor. Inchecking every example with the computer, I once again saw the integrityof Viktor Lvovich: only a very small number needing correcting and then,usually only cosmetically, tidying up illustrative variations. As every daywent by, I came to like the book more and more and I resolved to write afollow-up, using games played in the 21st century. But the classificationremains much the same as that used in the classic.In the words of Viktor Lvovich: ‘Since all the pieces differ amongthemselves according to their range and rules of movement, each ofthem has its favorite “profession”. In this sense, chess can be comparedwith an ice hockey team, where each player has worked out shots on goalfrom different points of the ice rink. The same can be said about thedistribution of roles in the joint attack on the king. Some pieces prefer a“passing” role, while others “hit the puck” by themselves.’This book A Modern Guide to Checkmating Patterns is divided into tenchapters: first, we present schemes and examples with explanations, andthen positions for independent solving. These number 851. A good sourcewas the online magazine Chess Today (chief editor Alexander Baburin),8

Forewordwhere I worked from 2000-2008. At first, I had 1,000 or so examples,but some fell by the wayside. I have spent some ten years working on thebook, on and off, and I should like to thank my former colleague AndreyPaneyakh for his great help, without which this manuscript would still begathering (virtual) dust on the computer.We will conclude this Foreword with a further quote from Mikhail Tal: ‘Ofcourse, chess creativity is not limited to what is set out here. Each playercreates further, according to his talent and imagination. But as for thatwhich can be known, there is no need to reinvent the wheel.’Vladimir BarskyMoscow, April 20209

CHAPTER 3The minor pieces and pawnsThe knight on its own can only give mate when the enemy king’s escapepaths are blocked by his own pieces. The most common form of this is theso-called ‘smothered mate’. TmNjJ. . .dMl.JsJn. . . TmN J.i. . . .n.jK M. .n.k.j. MM Kl.n. . .The bishop also needs the help of his own or enemy units to give mate.The most common constructions are the following:dMl.Jj. B. . .mI J. .b. . Lm. J. .b. . .mK J. .b. .43

A Modern Guide to Checkmating Patterns.j. ImI .b.k.jJ. .m. I.b.kTwo knights cannot mate a lone king on an empty board, but in a positionfull of life, they often constitute a powerful weapon. The most popularmating set-ups are as follows:. .mNj.n. . .mnNjJ. . . MnJjJ. N. .tMt.l.n. .n. .m. .K . . . N .n. . . .Knight and bishop, as a rule, usually do most damage to a king when it isin the corner or adjacent to it: b1 (b8) or g1 (g8). Consider the followingdiagrams:44.tM. J. .nb. .tMnJ J. .b. . .m. J. .nb. .MtJ Jn.b. .

Chapter 3 – The minor pieces and pawns. . Ml.nS J . . . . . .b. M.jJB N. .dMl.sB.n.M . .NkB. .lMI . .b.n.Two bishops are especially strong in the hands of the attacking side. Often,after delaying castling, the king is nailed to its initial position by theirjoint efforts, but he frequently has trouble in the corner as well. .m. JB .b. .Ml.S . B. .b. Mt. SB .b. .M . .k.b. BThe pawn, in order to give mate, needs the active assistance of his ownand often the enemy units as well. This is because, in checking the king, itdoes not control a single escape square.(see next page)45

A Modern Guide to Checkmating Patterns. MIi. K. .r. .j. M. Il.lMtIjJ. .n. .kBm.i. .The main heroes of this chapter usually succeed when the enemy king ison or near the edge of the board – either the rank or file. The exceptionis the pawn, as it can often catch the king in the centre of the board,although here too, the main role is played by those forces which cut off theking’s retreat.Piotr BobrasTatiana Kononenko25352387position, in which White is a wholequeen down.Port Erin 2013 (4). . R .j. D T . . . Mjj. J Lj. Jb. .i.i.qI . I . I . . .k.41. g8 h741. h5 42. xg5 xh4 43. f4 .42. h8 g6What has White achieved? After all,the queen does not have a singlesquare in the king’s field. But.43. xg5 !And Black resigned: 43.hxg544.h5# – an elegant mating46Igor KurnosovMarat Dzhumaev25772527Tashkent 2008 (8)T LdMl.t.j. J JJ .jJiJ. I .b.S . . .q. . .IiI .iIi .k.rBnRA painfully familiar picture: Blackis behind in development and hisopponent finds an elegant decision,where the main role is playedby the smallest unit, the bravefootsoldiers.

Chapter 3 – The minor pieces and pawns12. c6 ! d7 13. xe6 ! fxe613. e7 14. xe7 xe7 15. xa8 .14.dxe6!!White does not hesitate to sacrificeeven the queen: he threatens matein one (14. xc6 15.f7#).14. g7 15.exd7 Black resigned: huge material lossesare inevitable.Djurabek KhamrakulovSaidali Iuldachev25482501Tashkent ch-UZB 2008 (4). T T MJ NqJ . . R .jB . Ij.Ij.l. . . .bI. .d.i. . . .k.White has a material advantage, andwould seem to be winning after theprosaic 28. xe8 . However, in thiscase, he would have to reckon withthe passed pawn on b4 and analysisshows that White can count onlyon perpetual check. But he has acombinative path to victory, whichwas demonstrated in the game:28. g6 ! fxg6 29. f6 !Enticing the bishop to the fatalsquare.29. xf6 30. c4 Black resigned, seeing the mateafter 30. h8 31. xf6 h732.fxg6. And if instead 30. xc4White wins both rooks and a bishopby force – 31. xe8 g7 32. xg6 f8 33. xf6 e8 34. e6 and35. xc4, keeping an extra piece.Ian NepomniachtchiKrishnan Sasikiran27062681Khanty-Mansiysk ol 2010 (4).t. . L. . . .j.r. .M .iJjJJ . .s.iIr. . . . .bI . . .k.The black king is not yet on theedge, but White is able to force it tomake the fatal step.52. c8! e2 A so-called ‘spite check’.53. h2 xc8The Greek Gift must be accepted,else Black faces an endgame a rookdown (53. b7 54. xg8).54. xb6 . T . L. . . .r. . .M .iJjJJ . . .iI . . . . SbIk. . . .Black resigned: 54. a5 55.b4#.47

A Modern Guide to Checkmating PatternsEXERCISEST .dMl.t122 L S Jj.J . Ji.J . .j. .j. . B N .Ii. QiIi rN . Rk.T .dM .t123 jJjS Jj. L Js.j. . . . .i. .b.iB N .I I .iIi R Qr.k.124 . .r.tMj. .s. J. . J .iJ . . . J .bDi.q.j. .KiI . . . . . .125 . . . Tmj.rQ .lJ. . . .J . .b.I .iJi.I . .iK. . D .i . . . .126 . .s.tSt. . .d. M J .jjJnJiJjIL Ji.i.i.i. QiBR I . .k .b. R .127 . . . .j. . B . . . . . .jJR . . .I . .iMI T . .i . S .k.128 T T . Smj.d. . J. . JjJi.b. . .jQ I . . . .IiIr.iI .kR . .129 . TdMl.tJ SjJj.J .j. .ji. S . . .n.i. B . I.iIq.bI r. .k. R52

Exercises – The minor pieces and pawns130 TsL Ml.tjJ J Jj. . . .jd.jN S . . . .b.i. . .Ii. IiIi r. QkBnR131 T S . TmjJ Dl. J. . .j.b. J . B. .i. LI N . .I . Q Ii r. . Rk.132 TsLdM .tjJ J JjJ. . Js.l. .b. . N . . . .IiI IiIi r. QkBnR133 T .dM .t. J JjJJ SqJs.J . . . N L .bI . . .I I .iIi r. .kB R134 T . T .jLsJm. J . Jlj.bJ In.I . I .i. . .Bi. . .i .kR .r.135 T . T MJ . .lJ.j. . J. . J . .s. . B .iLIi.nIi. RbRk. .136 T D Tm.j. .sJlQ.j.j.nJ. . Ib.I . . . . . .iI . Ii . R Rk.137 .t. T ML J .jJJ . J .Ji.iJ . I Si.b. B Di.I Q R .i . . Rk.53

A Modern Guide to Checkmating Patterns138 T . T Ml. . J JJ .qL Jb.j. NiI.j. I . S I .IdIkB . . R . R139 . T .tM. . J JJ . .bD.lJ N .j. . .I . . .iI . .i K .qR .140 T .d.tMJ . JjJJ .l. L. J N .i. S .qi. Bi. I.b. .iI r. .k. R141 .s. .tMB . JjJ.jN Jl.jI . . . .q. .i. .s.i.b. Di.i .r. .k.142 T . Tm. .lJjBJ J L . Jn. Q.d. . . . . .I . .iIi .r.r.k.143 . Mt.l.tJ .jJjJJdS .sLBj. . .Q . IbIn.i. N IIi. .i. r. .r.k.144 . Tm.l.tdL .j. J. J . JBn. . Q. Ji. .i. . . . .i.i .b.kR .145 . .tM .tjQr.sJ J.s. . J. . . . .iN .lB Db. II . .iI . .k. R54

Chapter 11 – Solutions11331. xd8 xd8 32. f6! Aswell as a