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Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCSocial Thinking and Social Competencies .teaching more than social skillsMichelle Garcia WinnerFounder of the Social Thinking MethodologySpeech-Language Pathologist, MA-CCCThe Social Thinking methodology isdesigned for use with individuals, 4years old through adulthood, who havesolid to high-level expressive andreceptive language skills as well as solidto advanced verbal IQ.The Social Thinking Methodologyfocuses on teaching socialcompetencies, not just social skills.Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Financial Disclosure:I am the founder of the Social ThinkingMethodology and own all its intellectualproperty. I receive revenue from productsincluding books, games, eLearningmodules, etc.My company also provides a lot of freeinformation on our website:www.socialthinking.comMost people don’t about the importance of thesocial mind in our academic & vocational lives.Professionals, academic administrators,politicians, and journalists refer to socialcognition as “soft skills” and “non-cognitiveskills”We never begin treatment by teachingan individual to change a sociallybased behavior.1

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCThe Social Thinking methodology fostersmeta-cognitive social and emotionalawareness and learning strategies toenhance social competencies andmotivation for social learning.Social emotional concepts areembedded in the curriculum andacademic standards.To participate in the academic curriculum, andachieve one’s goals often requires the socialmind.Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Sophisticated social responses are notmemorized, they are produced as partof a social problem-solving andanxiety management processes.Reading comprehension ofliterature requires us toengage social competencies: Attend Interpret self and others Problem solve to figureout Social response (socialself-regulation)2

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCC3rd Grade Writing StandardWrite narratives to develop real orimagined experiences or events, usingeffective technique, descriptive details,and clear event sequences.response of characters to situationsContinued a) Establish a situation and introduce anarrator and/or characters; organize anevent sequence that unfolds naturallyb) Use dialogue and description of actions,thoughts, and feelings to developexperiences and events or show theInterested in helping studentslearn executive functions in theclassroom?Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-20193rd Grade: Reading LiteratureDescribe characters in a story (e.g., theirtraits, motivations, or feelings) andexplain how their actions contribute tothe sequence of events.The social mind requires executive functions to alsobe evolving: Perspective taking Goal setting Working memory Shifting flexibly Organizing Prioritizing Inhibition Self-monitoring (to co-regulate with others)SMARTSLynn Meltzer & the SMARTSteamwww.smarts-ef.org3

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCOur social mind is required forinterpretation of socially abstractconcepts that are the focus of readingcomprehension of literature, socialstudies, history, project based learning,math estimation, etc.Start Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019What does the research tell us aboutsocial learning?Social Information Processing (SIP) is critical forthe development of social competencies.Crick, N., & Dodge K. (1994). A Review and Reformulation of Social Information ProcessingMechanisms in Children's Social Adjustment. Psychological Bulletin. 115, 74-101.Beauchamp, M., & Anderson, V. (2010). SOCIAL: An Integrative Framework for theDevelopment of Social Skills. Psychological Bulletin. 136(1), 39-64.Considering this information combined withour clinical experience, we developedUsing an iceberg as an analogy (in the social world),people tend to focus and fix social behaviors. Butthere is so much more going on below the surface.SocialResponsesProblem SolvingSocial InterpretationSocialBehaviorsIntroducing Social Thinking’sSocial Competency ModelDevelopmentalDevelopmentalSocial Thinking’sSocial Competency Modelto explain the layers of sociallearningSocialResponsesProblem SolvingSocial Cognitive Self-RegulationSocialResponsesSocial InterpretationSocial AttentionCopyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comSocial Attention4

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCSocial Interpretation1.2.3.4.5.6.7.Acquired world knowledgeWhat is the situation?Who are the people?Basic emotionsSelf-conscious emotionsBasic theory of mindAdvanced, applied,spontaneous theoryof mindCT Critical thinkingStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Social Cognitive Self-RegulationEvaluationSocial selfof theawarenesssocialto compareSocialcontext:myself toResponsessituationothers inand whatthisis knowncontextabout thepeopleSocial Cognitive Self-RegulationOverloaded sensory processing and/orexperiencing compelling anxiety and/ordepression put a stop sign on accessingsocial cognition to develop or sustainsocial competencies.Possible Anxiety &Depression ManagementSocialResponsesSensory ProcessingWhat about screen time overwhelm in the social landscape?If Frosty isn’t attending to thesocial landscape, then neitherare kids on devices.Social attention in a landscapeis harder with a digital devicein your hand or on your desk!Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.com5

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Social Cognitive Self-RegulationScreen Time Overwhelm onPortable devices (STOP)Accessing social attention,interpretation, problem solving todecide responses can be blocked byscreen time attention!Portable digital devices are impactingthe development of socialcompetencies.SocialResponsesPossible Anxiety &Depression ManagementSensory ProcessingSocial cognitive self-regulationis more thanemotional self-regulation.DevelopmentalSocial Cognitive Self-RegulationSocialResponsesProblem SolvingSocialResponsesSocial InterpretationSocial AttentionOur interpretation involvesunderstanding of SELF and OTHERS aswell as differing points of views,beliefs, emotions, anxieties,memories, experiences, etc.Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comHow do we help studentsbecome more sociallycompetent?6

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019The Social Thinking Methodology engagesCognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)1. Cognitive behavior affects activity2. Cognitive activity may be monitored and altered3. Desired behavior change may be effectedthrough cognitive changesThe Social ThinkingMethodology develops tools forSocial Cognitive Behavioral TreatmentsDobson, K. & Dozois, D. (2001) Historical and philosophical bases of the cognitivebehavioral therapies. In K. Dobson (Ed.) Handbook of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies37(pp.3-39). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.We encourage a growth mindset!We explain how the socialworld works, rather than expectstudents to simply work in thesocial world!The Social ThinkingMethodology includestreatment frameworks andvocabularyCopyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comWe focus on helping individualsdevelop stronger sets of tools tosocially attend, interpret, problemsolve and respond in the socialworld.Treatment frameworks describeaspects of the social landscapeand what we want from eachother within that landscape.7

I think about you and you think about me.I think about your motives and intentions.I think about what you are thinking about me.I monitor my behavior and possibly adapt it totry to keep you thinking and feeling about methe way I want you to think and feel about me! .date1.2.3.4.FriendshipPyramidCloseFriendExploring thedifferencebetweenbeing friendlyandfriendshipndfrieainagoffainagOnFour Steps of Perspective TakingStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019PossiblyMichelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCBonded FriendFriendSituational FriendAcquaintanceGreetings - AcknowledgementsNeutral4 Steps of Face-to-Face (F-2-F) Communication1. Thinking about where we are and who I maywant to talk with2. Establishing a physical presence to showintention to communicate3. Use eyes to think about others4. Language to relate to others44Treatment strategies describespecific elements of social andexecutive functions to beapplied within the sociallandscapeAlso referred to asSocial Thinking VocabularySocial Thinking Vocabulary1.2.3.4.5.Thoughts and feelingsThe group planThink with your eyesBody in the group*Whole body listening*by Suzanne P Truesdale6. Expected-unexpectedbehavior7. Flexible vs stuckthinking8. Smart guess9. Size of the problem10.Shared imaginationCopyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.com10 free webinars on these10 strategies!www.socialthinking.com/webinars8

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCTo attend and interpret in the socialworld is to notice the context:Situation and PeopleSocial Thinking’s Social Competency Model:Free article and webinar on our ompetencyModelSocialResponsesProblem SolvinglntamelopveDeWhat’s the point of theseconcepts?Start Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Social InterpretationSocial AttentionSocial Thinking’s Treatment frameworksand VocabularyLanguage helps us to reflect,think and self-direct.To share space together or interact in aspecific context we try to figure out(*social evaluation) what is going onaround us to establish the hidden rules(*social norms).*Terms researchers utilizeCopyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.com9

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCWhy do this? To encourage people to see usworking collaboratively to achieve shared goals.You Tube Brain Game (conformity)Start Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Social Cognitive Self-Regulation requires:1. One’s ability to attend to the context2. Interpret the context specific social expectations3. Problem solve how to align one’s own socialresponse (behaviors/language) with with theseexpectations to follow the group plan, if one’s goal isto work effectively as part of the group.4. Produce the social response to participate in thegroup in the manner the student desiresThe Social Thinking Methodologyencourages students to become socialdetectives, spies, social scientists, etc. inorder to encourage them to learn tosocially attend, interpret and problemsolve the social context to produce thesocial responses that encourage othersto perceive them in the manner theydesire.58For teens who no longer wantto be Social Detectives, theygrown into becoming socialspies and participate in CSI Community Social InvestigationCopyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comUltimately, our Social Detectiveand spies are learning to noticehow each of us impacts others’thoughts and feelings.10

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCSocial Emotional Chain ReactionContext Situation PeopleExpectedUnexpectedbehaviorsbehaviors How the Doer behaves affects how people feel& think Which affects how they react & respond Which affects how the Doer feels and thinksabout self and othersWe encourage students to figure out thesocial norms/ hidden rules bydetermining the: Expected behavior Unexpected behaviorStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019dctex p e r?Eit h v iop w b eh auat ’s tedW h xp eceUn&Expltea ainingch th es th e b ee costnce waytpts oExpected and Unexpectedbehaviors are categorical termsencouraging students to noticehow specific behaviors, in specificcontexts, can be summarized asexpected or unexpected.Situation: Teacher explaining lesson to classContext Situation PeopleFor example:Teacher explaining lesson to classExpected behavior Body turned towards the teacherUnexpected behavior Body turned away from the teacher Thinking with eyes to look atteacher or what the teacher isreferring to Looking at one’s cell phone Student says ”I already know this!” Keep objects not related to lessonin one’s backpack Keep thoughts in your head whenthey are not helpful to the group.Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.com11

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCThese terms were created tohelp students better interpretthe social world.These terms were not created to tellstudents they are doing unexpectedbehavior!We each need to keep listeningto our clients to buildtreatment programs that aremeaningful to them.Developmental social emotional learningrequires constant updates in our abilityto consider our own and other’s socialperspectives.Based on the context and what we know about thepeople in that context:How do people might people think and feel aboutme?How do I think and feel about you?How do we read each other’s intentions?Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Ultimately, it come down tohelping students figure outwhat they want for themselves.Taking data that utilizes yourstudent’s narrative language todescribe their progressprovides evidence oftreatment’s validity andgeneralization.Self-reflection is critical in the sociallearning, social communicative process.12

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCOur students language basednarratives and portfolioassessments provide data todemonstrate social learning.Start Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019How powerful is this data?The magic of popsicle stick teaching!“Charles” - a case-study“Every kid, and I mean every kid, inthis school is a jerk”.CharlesEvery stick is a person.Every person has a brain.Every brain has a thought.Every thought is tied to an emotion.Avoid assumptionsHis perception:Charles had no experience makingfriends, being included in groups, ortalking to others outside of astructured academic environment.People did things to him.Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comHe did not feel his actions, in anyway, contributed to others as“jerks”.13

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCMany adolescents areinterested in exploring socialpsychology as long as theinterventionist doesn’t makethe lesson be all about thestudent.Social Operating SystemStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019The process of exploring his past learning tomotivate future learning was the basis forcreating and evolving his:Social Operating SystemAdministrators were not fond of him.1.0: Unaware of others, people assumed to beunfriendly12/2014“Anyway, I usually find people not outside,but a large group of people hanging outinside the main building hallways. And, tomake things more intense, people that Isee daily there at lunchtime, were in thosesame, almost exact locations along withother people, who probably hang there inthe morning.”Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comSocial Operating System1.0: Unaware of others, people assumed to beunfriendly2.0: Others might think I am sort of unfriendly14

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCCSept. 2015: In group“I must be doing something more social becausea kid came up to me after class and wanted towalk with me to my next class. I never had aperson ask me to do that before and I didn’tknow what to do! But you would be proud ofme, I did not tell him to go away!”Social Operating System updatesare basically rubrics you can definewith your students, based on theirabilities and needs.Social Operating System1.0: Unaware of others, people assumed to beunfriendly2.0: Others might think I am sort of unfriendly3.0: Finding people with similar interestsCopyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.comStart Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Charles’ challenges for which he was learningconcepts and strategies in the UPSTAIRS of his brain: Flexibility with peers and food Homework strategies Classroom management strategies Learning why he would relate to peers How to join in with peers Enjoying being with peers Making time to be with peers Desiring to be with peersFor Charles, the numerical part ofthe system helped him begin todevelop reflection of self andothers.“There is a girl in my class who I think is a1.0”*At that time Charles was at a 3.0I asked, “how can a 3.0 help a 1.0?”He then helped her, which in turn gavehim practice in relating to others. Win-win15

Michelle Garcia WinnerFounder: the Social Thinking Methodology;SLP, MA-CCC1.0:2.0:3.0:4.0:5.0:6.0:Social Operating SystemUnaware of others, people assumed to beunfriendlyOthers might think I am sort of unfriendlyFinding people with similar interestsFound a group of “friends” to sit withI really like being with othersLearning to talk, hangout & problem solvewith peersReflecting on what one is doing wellnow compared to the past,encourages validation of oneself andwhile also helping students becomemotivated to manage their next levelof vulnerabilities.Start Conference East Lansing, Michigan4-29-2019Self-reflection is critical in the socialcommunicative process.Narrative Language builds self reflectionWestby, C. & Culatta, B. (2016). Telling Tales: PersonalEvent Narratives and Life Stories. LSHSS Vol 47, 260-282Today has been about broadeninghow we define an emotionallandscape on the road to helpingstudents increase their socialcompetencies.This work fosters their well-being. and perhaps our helpingothers provides our ownlifetime of well being.Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc.All Rights Reservedwww.socialthinking.com16

Social Thinking’s Social Competency Model 2019Copyright 2019 Think Social Publishing, Inc. All Rights ReservedFree article on Social Competency Model www.socialthinking.com

ME MAPDerivative of a Social Behavior Mapping:Exploring my social expectations and related responses to the behaviors of another person.The numbers below guide the order in which you should progress working across the map.Person I am focusing on (1)Situation: (2)The behaviors I expect fromthis person in this situationHow I feel basedon their behaviorHow I react: based on how I feelHow the other person might feel, basedon how I react to that person.(4)(5)(6)(7)The behaviors this person mayproduce which I think areunexpected in this situation.How I feel basedon their behaviorHow I react: based on how I feelHow the other person might feel, basedon how I react to that person.(3)(8)(9)(10)Copyright 2016 Think Social Publishing, Inc. Derivative of a Social Behavior Map www.socialthinking.com

We encourage a growth mindset! We focus on helping individuals develop stronger sets of tools to socially attend, interpret, problem solve and respond in the social world. The Social Thinking Methodology includes treatment frameworks and vocabulary Treatment frameworks describe a