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RegistrarSearch lty and StaffCalendarsCatalogFormer StudentsStatisticsConsumer InfoMain titles for Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog2001-2003The UniversityUndergraduate EducationUndergraduate Schools and CoursesJudd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and SciencesSchool of Education and Social PolicyRobert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied SciencesMedill School of JournalismSchool of MusicSchool of SpeechOther Undergraduate ProgramsAdministration and FacultyCAESAR Registration and Courses Course and Teacher Evaluation Council (CTEC) Information for StudentsInformation for Faculty and Staff Calendars The Undergraduate CatalogInformation for Former Students Statistics Consumer InformationOffice of the Registrar Northwestern HomeOffice of the Registrar 633 Clark Street Evanston, Illinois 60208-1118Phone: 847-491-5234 Fax: 847-491-8458 E-mail: [email protected] Revision June 18, 2008World Wide Web Disclaimer and University Policy Statements 2005 Northwestern University

RegistrarSearch HelpNorthwesternReturn to Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003The University: Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003There are no entries for the Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003 under thistitle.CAESAR Registration and Courses Course and Teacher Evaluation Council (CTEC) Information for StudentsInformation for Faculty and Staff Calendars The Undergraduate CatalogInformation for Former Students Statistics Consumer InformationOffice of the Registrar Northwestern HomeOffice of the Registrar 633 Clark Street Evanston, Illinois 60208-1118Phone: 847-491-5234 Fax: 847-491-8458 E-mail: [email protected] Revision June 18, 2008World Wide Web Disclaimer and University Policy Statements 2005 Northwestern University

RegistrarSearch HelpNorthwesternReturn to Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003Undergraduate Education: Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003There are no entries for the Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003 under thistitle.CAESAR Registration and Courses Course and Teacher Evaluation Council (CTEC) Information for StudentsInformation for Faculty and Staff Calendars The Undergraduate CatalogInformation for Former Students Statistics Consumer InformationOffice of the Registrar Northwestern HomeOffice of the Registrar 633 Clark Street Evanston, Illinois 60208-1118Phone: 847-491-5234 Fax: 847-491-8458 E-mail: [email protected] Revision June 18, 2008World Wide Web Disclaimer and University Policy Statements 2005 Northwestern University

RegistrarSearch HelpNorthwesternReturn to Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003Undergraduate Schools and Courses: Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003There are no entries for the Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003 under thistitle.CAESAR Registration and Courses Course and Teacher Evaluation Council (CTEC) Information for StudentsInformation for Faculty and Staff Calendars The Undergraduate CatalogInformation for Former Students Statistics Consumer InformationOffice of the Registrar Northwestern HomeOffice of the Registrar 633 Clark Street Evanston, Illinois 60208-1118Phone: 847-491-5234 Fax: 847-491-8458 E-mail: [email protected] Revision June 18, 2008World Wide Web Disclaimer and University Policy Statements 2005 Northwestern University

RegistrarSearch HelpNorthwesternReturn to Supplement to the Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences: Supplement to the UndergraduateCatalog 2001-2003African American StudiesHistorical and Comparative StudiesPage: 43New CourseAF AM ST 381-0 Topics in Transnational Black CulturesAfrican and Asian Languages ProgramMinor in Chinese or Japanese LanguagePage: 45Description of Change:Minor course requirements (8 units)3 quarter-courses of 300 level Chinese or Japanese2 quarter courses of 400 level Chinese or JapanaeseNew text:Minor course requirements (5 units)3 quarter courses of 200 level Chinese or Japanese2 quarter courses of 300 level Chinese or Japanese

AnthropologyCourses Primarily for Juniors and SeniorsPage: 51New CourseANTHRO 391-0 Archaeology, Ethics, and Contemporary SocietyArchaeology is the study of the past, but understanding the past is important incontemporary society. This course addresses ethical issues of doing archaeology as studentsdevelop archaeological materials relevant for contemporary society. Prerequisites: 321, andjunior-level standing in the University.Art Theory and PracticeMajor in Art Theory and PracticePage: 54Description of Change:Delete text:"Areas of concentration are painting, printmaking, and the teaching of art. Specificrequirements in each area are listed below."New text:Specific requirements for the major are listed below.Major in Art Theory and PracticePractice of Art-Painting ConcentrationPage: 55Description of Change:Delete text: Practice of Art--Painting ConcentrationNew text:Requirements for Art Majors:Departmental coursesAt least 3 100-level courses:The department will offer 5 100-level classes including Basic Painting, Basic Drawing, BasicSculpture, Basic Photography, and Basic Design.

3 History and Criticism Courses:270-0 Introduction to Understanding Art or 272-0 Introduction to Understanding 20thCentury Art, and 2 of the following courses: 372-0 Contemporary Art Criticism or, from theDepartment of Art History, 220-0 Introduction to African Art, 230-0 Introduction to AmericanArt, 240-0 Introduction to Asian Art or 250-0 Introduction to European Art.4 300 level courses:one of which must be the Capstone Course4 other studio art courses at any level5 Related Courses200 and 300 level courses chosen from one or more of the following departments with theapproval of the department advisor: African-American Studies, Anthropology, Art History,Classics, Comparative Literature, English, French and Italian, German language andliterature, Hispanic Studies, History, Music, Philosophy, Slavic languages, and GenderStudies.19 Courses TotalPractice of Art-Printmaking ConcentrationPage: 55Description of Change:Delete text:Practice of Art--Printmaking ConcentrationDepartmental coursesIntroductory courses (6): 120; 124; 125; 270 or 272; any 2 courses chosen from ART HIST220, 230, 240, 250Major courses (8) 222; 225; 325-1 or-2; 331; 332;333;1 course chosen from those listed below under Art Criticism and the Tradition of Art; 1 200or 300-level art history electiveRelated courses: Same as for Practice of Art--PaintingNew text:Courses Primarily for UndergraduatesArt Criticism and the Tradition of ArtPage: 55Description of Change:Change course title and descriptionNew text:Art 372-0 Contemporary Art CriticismThis course examines the multiple contexts of the practice of contemporary art, with aspecial focus on issues such as art criticism, the role of the museum in the modern age, thepublic reception of contemporary art, and the art market and its strategies. Prerequisite:Junior, Senior or Graduate standing.

Page: 55Description of Change:Replace old course description.New text:272 Introduction to the Understanding of Contemporary ArtThis course is open to all undergraduate students wishing to gain anunderstanding of the major artistic movements and the role of visual artists in the 20thCentury. Concentrating on writings by artists and critics, the class focuses on contemporaryart, using several specific exhibitions and events in our area as foci for our attention. Noprerequisites.Page: 55Description of Change:Replace course description.New text:Art 270-0 Introduction to the Understanding of Contemporary ArtThis course is open to all undergraduates wishing to gain an understanding of the traditionsand stylistic evolution of Western visual arts. The format is lecture and discussion,emphasizing formal structure, composition and subject matter in painting, sculpture, andother media. No prerequisites.Painting and DrawingPage: 55ART 120-0 Basic Painting & CompositionDescription of Change:Delete course description for 120-0 Basic Painting & CompositionNew text:120-0 Basic Painting and CompositionThis course addresses various problems in painting and introduces students to modes ofvisual thinking. Work will be done in a two-dimensional format using oil paint on a gessoprepared ground on a canvas support.Page: 55ART 124-0 Basic DesignDescription of Change:Change course title and descriptionNew text:Art 124-0 Basic DesignThis course provides an introduction to the basic elements of visual language in twodimensional and/or three-dimensional formats.Through the completion of studio problems

intended to highlight specific design principles, students begin to develop an understandingof formal and compositional elements such as line, shape, form, space, texture, value andcolor. No previous studio experience necessary.Page: 55ART 125-0 Basic DrawingDescription of Change:Replace old course descriptionNew text:This course introduces students to the expressive use of various graphic media such ascharcoal, pencil, crayon, chalk, pen and ink, and/or brush and wash. Specific techniques suchas form modeling, spatial illusions, and principles of linear perspective may be explored. Noprerequisites.Page: 55ART 222-0 Intermediate PaintingDescription of Change:Replace old course descriptionNew text:Building on the concepts and skills learned in Basic Painting, this course is structured to helpeach student develop a visual language and technical skill. Brief lectures, demonstrations anddiscussions may be used to introduce and clarify new concepts. Prerequisite: 120 BasicPaintingPage: 55ART 225-0 Intermediate DrawingDescription of Change:Replace old course descriptionNew text:This course is structured with the premise that students have had previous experience withthe basic elements of drawing. Attention is given to the continued development of perceptualabilities and drawing skills, as well as content and creative thought. Prerequisite: 125 BasicDrawing or 120 Basic Painting or equivalent.Page: 55ART 322-1,2 Advanced PaintingDescription of Change:Replace old course descriptionNew text:This course is designed for students that have completed both basic and intermediate levelpainting or the equivalent. The structure of this course emphasizes the development andcoordination of each student's individual studio practice. Prerequisites: 222 Intermediate

Painting or equivalent.Page: 55ART 325-1,2 Advanced DrawingDescription of Change:Replace old course descriptionNew text:This course is designed for advanced students with a high proficiency in drawing. Majoremphasis is on the development of the graphic imagination through self-exploratoryproblems. Prerequisites: 225 Intermediate Drawing or consent of the instructor.PhotographyPage: 55ART 250-1,2 Basic PhotographyDescription of Change:Replace old title and course descriptionNew text:250-0 Intermediate PhotographyThis course builds on the concepts and skills explored in 150-0 Basic Photography, andincludes advanced lab work and the photographic techniques of archival processing andstudio lighting. Prerequisite: 150-0 Basic PhotographyPage: 55ART 350-0 Photography: History, Concepts & IdeasDescription of Change:Replace old title and course descriptionNew text:350-0 Advanced PhotographyThis class provides a forum for the creation and discussion of photo-based work for theadvanced student. After an introduction to ideas and issues in contemporary photographythrough readings, slides and class discussion, the bulk of class time is spent on groupcritique of student work. Prerequisites: 250 Intermediate Photography or equivalent.Page: 55New CourseART 150-0 Basic PhotographyThis course concentrates on extensive darkroom instruction focusing on the production ofhigh-quality black and white prints. Class sessions are devoted to lecture/demonstrationsand group critiques that address both technique and content. No prerequisites.

Page: 55ART 352-0 Color PhotographyDescription of Change:Replace old course number and course description.New text:252-0 Color PhotographyThis course explores techniques and issues of contemporary color photographic processeswith some emphasis on archival digital printing. Familiarity with fundamental photographicprocesses is assumed and topics discussed build on critical and technical skills developed in150 Basic Photography. Prerequisites: 150 Basic Photography or equivalent.PrintmakingPage: 55ART 331-0 Relief PrintmakingDescription of Change:Replace old course number and course description.New text:231-0 Relief PrintmakingThis course addresses the concepts and processes of relief printmaking including linoleum,woodcut, collograph, and monotype. A minimum of four prints will be produced, one usingeach technique. Prerequisites: 120 Basic Painting or 124 Basic Design or 125 Basic Drawingor equivalent.Page: 55ART 332-0 IntaglioDescription of Change:Replace old course number and description.New text:232-0 IntaglioThis course addresses the concepts and processes of intaglio printmaking. Topics coveredinclude plate preparation, etching, engraving, proofing, drypoint, aquatint, editioning prints,soft ground, chine colle', lift ground, and color printing. Prerequisites: 120 Basic Painting or124 Basic Design or 125 Basic Drawing or equivalent.Page: 56ART 333-0 LithographyDescription of Change:Replace old course description.New text:In this course, a wide range of recently innovated techniques are taught on lithographicstone. Students learn traditional drawing techniques, wet and dry additive and subtractive,

acid tinting, multiple color printing, reversal and transfer techniques. Prerequisites: 120 BasicPainting or 124 Basic Design or 125 Basic Drawing or equivalent.SculpturePage: 56ART 240-0 Sculpture in Traditional MaterialsDescription of Change:Replace old course title and course description.New text:240 Intermediate SculptureThis course investigates concepts, forms, and processes in sculpture with emphasis on thedevelopment of a personal artistic direction. Students develop individualized projects throughclass discussions and one-on-one meetings with the instructor. Prerequisite: 140 BasicSculpture or permission of instructor.Page: 56ART 340-0 Installation ArtDescription of Change:Replace old course name and course description.New text:340-0 Installation ArtThis course explores installation art in all media. Students may incorporate a variety ofmedia including video, photography, painting, projected light, sound, and sculpturalmaterials in works that expand the physical boundaries of art beyond the discrete object.Prerequisite: Basic Sculpture or permission of instructor.Page: 55New CourseART 140-0 Basic Sculpture140 Basic SculptureThis course is a basic introduction to sculptural concerns and issues of three dimensionalform. It includes instruction in traditional modeling techniques in clay, plaster andwoodworking. No prerequisites.Other CoursesPage: 56ART 390-0 Special Topics in ArtDescription of Change:Replace old course description.

New text:This course is designed around a topic or theme of special interest in contemporary visualart. It may be a studio-based course or be taught in a seminar format. Teaching method andevaluation will vary with the instructor. Prerequisite: varies with instructor.Page: 56ART 399-0 Independent StudyDescription of Change:Independent study is designed for advanced students who will work one-on-one with afaculty advisor to develop a specific independent studio project. Preference is given to seniorhonors candidates. Independent study students are acceped only by permission of instructorwho must be a member of the full-time faculty.New text:Page:New CourseART 224-0 Color TheoryThis course provides an introduction to color theory with emphasis on its application to thevisual arts. Students will learn key terms and the basics of color physics and the physiologyof visual perception. No prerequisites.Page:New CourseART 360-0 Video ArtThis course focuses on the studio production of video art. Students shoot, edit and presenttheir works to the class. Critical inquiry into the use of video as a medium in the visual arts isexplored through the viewing of key works and the examination of current trends in video artin galleries and museums, including the use of video in installation and its incorporation insculptural works. Prerequisites: At least one 100 level and one 200 level course in thedepartment.Page:New CourseART 380 Majors Capstone ClassThe goal of this course, designed for junior and senior art majors working in all media, is toassist students in the development of a self-motivated individual studio practice. Studentswork towards developing a strong and coherent portfolio, honing their critical skills, andlearning to be articulate about the concerns they explore through their work in both verbaland written formats. Prerequisite: Junior or senior art majors only or permission of instructor.

Asian American Studies ProgramMinor in Asian American StudiesPage: 56Description of Change:New CourseNew text:ASIAN AM ST 380 Asian American PerformanceClassicsMinor Concentrations in ClassicsPage: 64Description of Change:Change the first sentence in the first paragraph to read:New text:The minor concentrations in either Latin or Greek consist of nine courses: 3 language coursesat or above the 200 level, three approved 300-level Classics courses, and 3 Classics coursesat any level (may include courses at the 100 level in either language).Page: 64Description of Change:In the second paragraph, omit the last line and a half of the last sentence which reads:New text:and allow the exemption(s) to count toward requirements for the minor."Minor Concentrations in ClassicsLatinPage: 65Description of Change:(a) change "6 units" to "9 units"(b) change to bulleted requirement to read as follows (replacing what is there now):New text:

- 3 courses in Latin at or above the 200 level- 3 300-level Classics courses in either Latin or English- 3 courses at any level offered by the Classics Department with readings in Latin, Greek, orEnglishGreekPage: 65Description of Change:(a) change "6 units" to "9 units"(b) change the bulleted requirements to read as follows (replacing what is there now):New text:- 3 courses in Greek at or above the 200 level- 3 300-level classics courses with readings in either Greek or English- 3 courses offered by the Classics Department at any level with readings in Greek, Latin, orEnglishComparative Literary Studies ProgramMajor in Comparative Literary StudiesPage: 67Description of Change:The major in Comparative Literary Studies is now organized in a three-tier system, whichoffers majors both a carefully structured introduction to the principal tools and questions ofcomparative literary studies today and an opportunity to develop individual areas of interest.New text:The first tier consists of six courses which serve to introduce students both to "traditional"skills and perspectives in literary and cultural interpretation and to alternative modes ofreading that call the assumptions of cultural tradition into question.In the second tier, comprised of seven more advanced courses, the techniques and problemsto which the student has been introduced are put to work in a specialized "area ofconcentration."The second tier allows the student to go into greater depth with selected texts and questionsand to develop an independent and sophisticated approach to literary study. Students areencouraged to develop concentrations that match their own particular interests.Concentrations are chosen by the spring of the junior year in consultation with anundergraduate advisor in the program.The third tier consists of the writing of a required senior thesis that forms the focus of thesenior year program in CLS. Students begin by participating in a senior tutorial, whichintroduces them to the forms of research that they will need to write a successful seniorthesis. Each student then chooses an advisor who directs his or her work on the thesis. Allmajors with a qualifying grade point average (3.3 and above) are required to submit theiressays to be considered for honors.

Students can apply to the CLS major at any time during the sophomore year. To apply, theyshould submit a short essay describing their interests and background in comparative literarystudies to the director of the CLS program. Students will be admitted to the major on thebasis of this essay and subsequent discussion with the program director. A maximum of 15students will be admitted from any one class, so it is wise to apply early in the sophomoreyear if possible.Courses Primarily for Freshmen and SophomoresPage: 68COMP LIT 201-1 Introduction to the EpicDescription of Change:New courseNew text:An introduction to selected classics of the Western European literary tradition from Homerand Genesis forward with modern transformations of traditional themes.Page: 68COMP LIT 202-0 The Novel: Theory and PracticeDescription of Change:New courseNew text:What do realist novels teach us that it would be difficult or impossible to learn elsewhere?This course explores what is particularly novelistic about novels, the specific ways in whichthey conceive of the human personality, society, ethics, and life's meaning. In order tounderstand these concerns, we will also explore novelistic techniques so that students willdevelop the skills to read great novels on their own with greater understandingPage: 68Description of Change:New course titleNew text:The Novel: Theory and PracticePage: 68COMP LIT 203-0 Introduction to Lyric PoetryDescription of Change:New courseNew text:Lyric poetry has existed in practically every literary culture from ancient times until today.

What is the basic lyric impulse? How is lyric related to music, to visual art, and to otherliterary forms? How can lyrics from a variety of national traditions and time periods becompared? This course attempts to examine lyric poetry as a constant and ever-growinginternational literary tradition, to account for the variety of its forms and uses, and tointroduce students to some of the world's most moving literary works.Page: 68COMP LIT 206-0 Literature and MediaDescription of Change:New courseNew text:The course follows the historical development of three foundational ways of conceiving of therelationship between "literature" and "media" within Western culture. Beginning with Plato'scomplaint against the errant technologies of writing and rhetoric, students will trace the longconversation in the West that concerns strategies of writing and representation and theirrelationship to problems of authority and power. Following this, students will investigate casestudies that exemplify material changes to the production of literature and to technologies oftransmission. The third segment of the course concerns the impact of computer writing andimaging technologies on the boundaries and production of literature, both within theAcademy and without.Page: 68COMP LIT 207-0 Introduction to Critical TheoryDescription of Change:New courseNew text:The closely related ideas of crisis, criticism, and critique have been at the center of a widerange of philosophical, literary, social, political, and cultural programs for the last twohundred and fifty years. Critiques correspond to crises. Critical theory seeks to groundcriticism in a systematic manner and to disclose, in turn, the full range of the crisis to whichany critical impulse responds. The objects investigated in critical theory vary-from abstractconcepts and particular works of art to concrete social conditions and current political formsand indeed the diversity of objects studied in critical theory is one of its greatest strengths.Critical TheoryPage: 70Description of Change:New minorNew text:"Critical Theory" is a term that over the past three decades, particularly in the U.S., hascome to designate a type of study that cuts across existing disciplines and that entailsreflection upon the premises, concepts and categories that structure academic discourse in

areas such as literary studies, art history, film studies, history and political theory, to namejust a few. Critical theory can therefore not be limited to a particular field or even to aspecific content; it is involved wherever methods and concepts are not simply taken forgranted but subjected to critical reflection in a systematic and rigorous fashion. The minor inCritical Theory is an interdisciplinary program of study enabling undergraduates to acquire anunderstanding of the many dimensions of, and fields of application for, critical theory.EconomicsCourses Primarily for Sophomores, Juniors, and SeniorsPage: 72Description of Change:Corrects typographical error in prerequisites for Economics 308New text:Prerequisites: 281, 310-1, 311Page: 73New CourseECON 330-0 Behavioral EconomicsUnderstanding of how humans make choices in economic situations. The incorporation ofpsychology and/or sociology into economics. Topics may include perceptions, judgement,biases, and social pressure. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2.EnglishMajors in EnglishEnglish and American LiteraturePage: 74Description of Change:clarifying major requirementsNew text: at least 9 courses must be at the 300 level or abovePage: 74

Description of Change:clarifying major requirementsNew text: at least 8 must be English department courses, literature courses offered by theDepartment of African American Studies, or courses taught by members of the Englishdepartment through other departments or programs and that deal substantially with literaryworks originally written in English (i.e., not in English translation)Minors in EnglishPage: 75Description of Change:clarifying Introductory coursesNew text:Introductory courses: 210-1,2 or 270-1,2; 298Gender Studies ProgramCoursesPage: 84New CourseGNDR ST 240 Gender Studies for a Small PlanetGermanMajor in GermanPage: 88Description of Change:Courses indicated as a prerequisite for an advanced course may not be taken for credit afterthe advanced course has been completed. Students returning froma study abroad program in their junior year must enroll in1 300-level quarter course in the department.Departmental coursesCore courses (12) Language (4 units):205 (may be repeated for credit with different topic)203, 208, or 2802 quarter-courses of 391, 1 on advanced grammar and composition and 1 on advanced

conversation Literature (3 units): 3 quarter-courses chosen from 201-1,2,3,4; 204; 215 Culture (4 units): 4 quarter-courses chosen from 301; 310-1,2,3,4; 329; 332 Modern history (1 unit): History 344-2 or 349ConcentrationsNew text:Courses indicated as a prerequisite for an advanced course may not be taken for credit afterthe advanced course has been completed. Students returning froma study abroad program in their junior year must enroll inone 300-level quarter course in the department.Core courses (12) Language (4 units):1 quarter course of 2051 quarter course chosen from 203, 208, or 2802 quarter-courses of 391, 1 on advanced grammar and composition and 1 on advancedconversation Literature (3 units): 3 quarter-courses chosen from 201-1,2,3,4; 204; 215 Culture (4 units): 4 quarter-courses chosen from 301; 310-1,2,3,4; 329; 332 Modern history (1 unit): History 344-2 or 349Concentrations (5 units each)Minors in GermanPage: 88Description of Change:Minor in German (9 units) Language (4 units):205 (may be repeated for credit with different topic)203, 208, or 2802 quarter-courses of 391, 1 on advanced grammar and composition and 1 on advancedconversation Literature/culture (4 units):2 quarter-courses chosen from 201-1,2,3,4; 204; 2152 quarter-courses chosen from 301; 310-1,2,3,4; 329; 332 Modern history (1 unit): History 344-2 or 349Minor in Business German (9 units) Language (4 units)205 (may be repeated for credit with different topic)2 quarter-courses chosen from 203 or 2082 quarter-courses of 391, 1 on advanced grammarand composition and 1 on advanced conversation Business German (3 units): 1 quarter-course of 280 and 380 (380 may be repeated forcredit with different topic) Economics (1 unit): Econ 201 or 202 Literature/Culture (1 unit): 1 quarter-course chosen from 201-1,2,3,4; 204; 215New text:Minor in German (9 units) Language (4 units):1 quarter course of 2051 quarter course chosen from 203, 208, or 2802 quarter-courses of 391, 1 on advanced grammar and composition and 1 on advanced

conversation Literature/culture (4 units):2 quarter-courses chosen from 201-1,2,3,4; 204; 2152 quarter-courses chosen from 301; 310-1,2,3,4; 329; 332 Modern history (1 unit): History 344-2 or 349Minor in Business German (9 units) Language (4 units)1 quarter course of 2051 quarter course chosen from 203 and 2082 quarter-courses of 391, 1 on advanced grammarand composition and 1 on advanced conversation Business German (3 units): 1 quarter course of 280 and 2 quarter courses of 380 Economics (1 unit): Econ 201 or 202 Literature/Culture (1 unit): 1 quarter-course chosen from 201-1,2,3,4; 204; 215Language CoursesPage: 89GERMAN 203-0 Intermediate ConversationDescription of Change:Prerequisite corrected from 102-1 to 102-2New text:Practical training in communication skills with sole emphasis on listening comprehension andspeaking. May be repeated for credit with different materials.Prerequisite: 102-2 or equivalent.Hispanic StudiesPage: 90Description of Change:The department name has been changed to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.New text:Department of Spanish and PortugueseIntegrated Science ProgramPage: 97Description of Change:New text:

The Integrated Science Program (ISP) is a highly selective curriculum of natural sciences andmathematics pre

270-0 Introduction to Understanding Art or 272-0 Introduction to Understanding 20th Century Art, and 2 of the following courses: 372-0 Contemporary Art Criticism or, from the Department of Art History, 220-0 Introduction to African Art, 230-0 Introduction to American Art, 240-0 Introduction to Asian Art