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Online EducationState University System of FloridaAnnual Report 2017BOARD OF GOVERNORS APPROVED 3/29/2018

Table of ContentsHighlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 03Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 04Implementation of the 2025 Strategic Plan for Online EducationStudent Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 05 - 11Florida’s Ranking in Distance Learning EnrollmentsStudent Enrollments (Headcounts)Credit Hours by Delivery MethodHistorical Full-Time Equivalents (FTE) in Distance Learning CoursesStudent Demographics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 - 13Age of StudentGenderRace/EthnicityResidencyStudent Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 - 17Florida Virtual CampusMyCareerShinesOpen Educational Resources and eTextbooksTutoringProctoringStudent ServicesStudent LifeAcademic Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 - 25Online ProgramsUF OnlineComplete FloridaComplete Florida MilitaryInnovative StrategiesUnizinState Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA)Grade ComparisonRetentionTime to DegreeProfessional DevelopmentQuality CoursesResearchAffordability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 - 27Cost of Online Education ReportCommon LMSImplact of Online Enrollments on FacilitiesInfrastructureResources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 - 30Online Education 20172

Highlights The SUS 2017 Annual Report for Online Education reflects the progress universities have made in online education1, inaddition to their opportunities for further improvement. In 2016-17: F lorida continued to be a leader in the provision of distance learning courses, ranking second in the nation in boththe number and percentage of students enrolled in distance learning courses (Texas was first in the number andArizona first in the percentage). Sixty-nine percent (69%) of SUS undergraduate students took at least one distance learning course. ystem-wide, 216,358 undergraduate students took at least one distance learning course and 96,970 Sundergraduate students took no distance learning courses. Of undergraduate credit hours, 26% were taken in distance learning courses, an increase from 24% in 2015-16. F or graduate courses, 27% of student credit hours system-wide were taken in distance learning courses, anincrease from 25% in 2015-16. T here were 36,549 graduate students who took at least one distance learning course, while 38,333 graduatestudents took no distance learning courses. T he average number of years to degree for full-time, first time in college (FTIC) baccalaureate students in 120-hourprograms was 4.08 for students who took no distance learning courses, and 3.75 for students who took 41% - 80%of their courses via distance learning. Undergraduates who took only distance learning courses were older (average age of 28) than students who tookno distance learning courses or a mix of distance learning and non-distance learning (classroom and/or hybrid)courses (average age of 22 for both groups). Older students are more likely to be place-bound, working full-timeand/or supporting families, making distance learning an ideal way for them to complete their degrees. Of undergraduate students who took only online courses, 96% were Florida residents and 4% non-residents. A wide variety of student services for online students were available, such as the FloridaShines site that providessuch materials and resources as financial aid information, library catalogs, the distance learning course catalog,My Career Shines education and training tool, and the Transient Student Admissions Application.1Online education is one type of distance learning and is the focus of this report. Because distance learning encompasses other modalities when instructor and student areseparated by time and /or distance, such as correspondence courses and courses broadcast over television networks, the term “distance learning” is used in this plan whenappropriate.Distance Learning is defined in Section 1009.24(17), Florida Statutes, as a course in which at least 80% of the direct instruction of the course is delivered using some form oftechnology when the student and instructor are separated by time or distance, or bothOnline Education 20173

IntroductionThe State University System 2017 Annual Report for Online Education provides a comprehensive review of online educationin the System. The Annual Report is a companion document to the State University System 2025 Strategic Plan for OnlineEducation, which was adopted by the Board of Governors in November 2015 to guide the growth of online education in theSystem and to ensure quality instruction and services are being provided in a cost-efficient and effective manner.The Board of Governors believes that online education provides a means to address capacity requirements while providingstudents with options for completing their education in a timely manner. Online education allows individuals with family orwork obligations to complete their education and on-campus students to accelerate the completion of their degrees and/orengage in co-curricular activities. The Annual Report serves as a mechanism to review the initiatives, accomplishments, andopportunities for improvement in online education in the System.Implementation of the 2025 Strategic Plan for Online EducationThe SUS 2025 Strategic Plan for Online Education presents goals, strategies, and tactics organized around the primaryelements of Quality, Access, and Affordability, building on the collective strength of institutions in the System. Upon thePlan’s adoption by the Board of Governors in November 2015, the Board Office immediately worked with institutions toestablish a system-wide Implementation Committee that consists of representatives from all institutions, and a SteeringCommittee that guides the work of the Implementation Committee. (Appendix A).The Steering Committee was expanded to seven members in February 2017, with six voting members being drawn from theCouncil of Academic Vice Presidents and appointed by and reporting to the Chancellor, and one non-voting member of theChancellor’s staff. By-laws were developed to codify the responsibilities and operations of the Committee.Under the general guidance of the Implementation Committee, system-wide workgroups created to address specific tacticsin the Plan continued to fulfill their charges. The structure of the process was evaluated by the Implementation CommitteeChair, workgroup chairs, and Board staff, resulting in two workgroups being disbanded when all their deliverables had beencompleted and approved by the Steering Committee, and one workgroup being expanded to reflect its revised charge. Insome instances, sub-groups of experts were formed to address specific issues assigned to workgroups. Over 100 peoplefrom throughout the SUS – and some from the Florida College System - have served on these committees, workgroups, andsub-groups, and – in total – over 120 meetings have been held so far.I frequently hear back from former OMBA students telling me the impact the MBA program, and mycourse, has had on them and their careers. Engineers, business majors, and non-business majors are alleligible for the program, and the breadth of disciplines that students bring into the classes makes for greatsynergy and exchange of ideas. These students work for the top accounting, finance, and engineeringcompanies, amongst others, and the online MBA program helps them succeed and move upward.PROFESSOR FIONA BARNES WHO TEACHES UF BUSINESS COMMUNICATION TO ONLINE MBA STUDENTSOnline Education 20174

Student EnrollmentFlorida’s Ranking in Distance Learning EnrollmentsFlorida continues to be a leader in distance learning, ranking second in the nation in both the number and percentage ofstudents enrolled in distance learning courses.TOP TEN STATES FOR DISTANCE LEARNING ENROLLMENT HEADCOUNTS BY FALL TERMfor All Levels Among Public 4YR, Primarily Baccalaureate-granting 32014N. AGE OF STUDENTS ENROLLED IN DISTANCE LEARNING (SOME OR ONLY)TOP TEN STATES FOR DISTANCE LEARNING ENROLLMENT HEADCOUNTS BY FALL 0%0%ARIZONAFLORIDAMARYLANDTEXASN. 8%26%24%19%SOURCE: Board of Governors staff analysis of US Dept. of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) available at the Integrated Postsecondary Education DataSystem (IPEDS) website (data extracted 1/02/2018). Notes: IPEDS defines Distance Learning as instructional content that is delivered exclusively (100%) via distance educationwithin a Fall term – Florida statute defines Distance Learning as at least 80%. It is important to note that the percent of total students enrolled in at least one DL course for the entire2016-17 academic year jumps to 64%, because the expanded time period provides more opportunities for a student to take a DL course.69%Online Education 2017OF SUS UNDERGRADUATESTUDENTS TOOK AT LEASTONE DISTANCE LEARNINGCOURSE IN 2016-175

Student Enrollments (Headcounts)UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTSSystem-wide, 69% of undergraduate students took at least one distance learning course in academic year 2016-17,an increase from 66% in 2015-16. Four institutions were above 75% (UCF, UF, USF, and UWF). The three institutionswith the greatest increases from the prior year were FAMU (from 15% to 25%), FSU (from 53% to 60%), and UNF (from54% to 61%).Ten percent of SUS undergraduates took only distance learning courses, with one institution having more than 20% (UWF).PERCENT OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ENROLLED INAT LEAST ONE DISTANCE LEARNING %FAMUFAUFGCUFIUFPUFSUAY 2015-2016NCFUCFUFUNFUSFUWFSUSAY 2016-2017SOURCE: BOG-ODA staff analysis of SUDS datamarts, extracted 2017-12-29.Notes: Undergraduate students include Lower- and Upper- division only – excludes unclassified students. Distance Learning is a coursein which at least 80 percent of the direct instruction of the course is delivered using some form of technology when the student andinstructor are separated by time or space, or both (per 1009.24(17), F.S.). Delivery Method categories are based on element #2052.PERCENT OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ENROLLEDIN ONLY DISTANCE LEARNING COURSES25%21%19%20%14%13%15%13%12%10%8%10%9%6% 6%4% 4%5%4%3% 3%9%8%10%5%1%0%FAMUFAUFGCUFIUFPUFSUAY 2015-2016NCFUCFUFUNFUSFUWFSUSAY 2016-2017SOURCE: BOG-ODA staff analysis of SUDS datamarts, extracted 2017-12-29.Notes: Undergraduate students include Lower- and Upper- division only – excludes unclassified students. Distance Learning is a course in which at least 80 percent of the directinstruction of the course is delivered using some form of technology when the student and instructor are separated by time or space, or both (per 1009.24(17), F.S.). DeliveryMethod categories are based on element #2052.Online Education 20176

2016-2017 UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT ENROLLMENTSSTUDENTSWHO TOOK ONLYDL COURSESINSTITUTIONHEADCOUNTSTUDENTS WHO TOOKBOTH DL AND CLASSROOMAND/OR HYBRID COURSESPERCENTAGEHEADCOUNTPERCENTAGESTUDENTSWHO TOOK NODL 96,97031%SOURCE: BOG Office of Data & Analytics, 2017-12-29. Undergraduates based on lower- and upper-division student level. Only includes students enrolled in courses.2016-2017 GRADUATE STUDENT ENROLLMENTSSTUDENTSWHO TOOK ONLYDL COURSESINSTITUTIONHEADCOUNTSTUDENTS WHO TOOKBOTH DL AND CLASSROOMAND/OR HYBRID COURSESPERCENTAGEHEADCOUNTPERCENTAGESTUDENTSWHO TOOK NODL %46613%SUS15,80521%20,74428%38,33351%SOURCE: BOG Office of Data & Analytics, 2017-12-29. Undergraduates based on lower- and upper-division student level. Only includes students enrolled in courses.Online Education 20177

GRADUATE STUDENTSSystem-wide, the percentage of graduate students taking one or more distance learning courses increased from 46% in2015-16 to 49% in 2016-17. UWF has the largest percentage of graduate students taking distance learning courses (87%).PERCENT OF GRADUATE STUDENTS ENROLLED INONLY DISTANCE LEARNING %17%18%2% 1%FAMU14%16%0% 0% 0%FSUAY 2015-2016NCFUNFUSFUWFSUSAY 2016-2017Source: BOG Office of Data & Analytics, 2017-12-29. Graduates based on beginning- and advanced-graduate student level. Only includes students enrolled in courses.PERCENT OF GRADUATE STUDENTS ENROLLED INAT LEAST ONE DISTANCE LEARNING 51%53%11%0% 0%FAMUFAUFGCUFIUFPU0% 0%FSUAY 2015-2016NCFUNFUSFUWFSUSAY 2016-2017Source: BOG Office of Data & Analytics, 2017-12-29. Graduates based on beginning- and advanced-graduate student level. Only includes students enrolled in courses.Online Education 20178

Credit Hours by Delivery MethodUNDERGRADUATE CREDIT HOURSSystem-wide, 26% of undergraduate credit hours were taken in distance learning courses in 2016-17, an increase from 24%in 2015-16. UCF and UWF had the highest percentage (33%), with UF following closely with 32%.DISTANCE LEARNING % OF THE SUS TOTAL- UNDERGRADUATE USF, 15%UNF, 4%UWF, 4%FAMU, 0%FAU, 7%FGCU, 4%“Our cyber talent strategy at Raymond JamesFinancial is centered on hiring and retaininghighly motivated associates who demonstratea hunger for learning, high team orientation,excellent communications skills, and a passionfor solving tough problems. USF has beenour leading university for sourcing cyber talentUF, 17%and an outstanding resource for ongoing staffFIU, 17%development. I look forward to continuingour partnership and benefitting from USF’sFPU, 0%UCF, 24%FSU, 8%NCF, 0%commitment to cyber security as we all grapplewith the challenges of an ever-digital world”.SOURCE: BOG-ODA staff analysis of SUDS datamarts, extracted 2017-12-21.Notes: Undergraduate courses include Lower- and Upper- division only – excludes unclassifiedstudents. Delivery Method categories are based on element #2052. Includes all instructionalactivity regardless of funding sources.Online Education 2017ANDY ZOLPERSENIOR VICE PRESIDENT - CHIEFINFORMATION SECURITY OFFICER & HEAD OFTECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE AT RAYMONDJAMES FINANCIAL, INC.9

GRADUATE CREDIT HOURSFor graduate courses, 27% of credit hours were in distance learning courses in 2016-17, an increase from 25% in 2015-16.UWF’s percentage, the highest in the System, increased from 75% in 2015-16 to 81% in 2016-17. The second highest wasFAU at 32%.DISTANCE LEARNING % OF THE SUS TOTAL- GRADUATE USF, 16%UWF, 10%and in-demand industry knowledge via vehiclesthat are used on a daily basis makes thetransition to a fully online master’s degreeFAMU, 0%FAU, 7%UNF, 2%Providing students with the relevant, necessaryFGCU, 2%program in Global Strategic Communications(GSC) practically seamless. Our studentsengage with faculty and with one another viaFIU, 12%FPU, 0%UF, 29%FSU, 8%NCF, 0%UCF, 12%chat, video, discussion board, and email –much as they do in most professional businesssettings. Whether coming to the GSC programfrom a traditional, on-campus setting or anonline program, our students are motivated,engaged and ready to take on the next stepSOURCE: BOG-ODA staff analysis of SUDS datamarts, extracted 2017-12-21.Undergraduate courses include Lower- and Upper- division only – excludes unclassifiedstudents. Distance Learning is a course in which at least 80 percent of the direct instructionof the course is delivered using some form of technology when the student and instructor areseparated by time or space, or both (per 1009.24(17), F.S.). Delivery Method categories arebased on element #2052. Includes all instructional activity regardless of funding sources.Online Education 2017of their academic and professional journeys.AILEEN IZQUIERDO, FIU INSTRUCTORDIRECTOR, GLOBAL STRATEGICCOMMUNICATIONS10

Historical Full-Time Equivalents (FTE) inDistance Learning CoursesA Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) student is a measure of instructional activity that is based on the number of credit hours inwhich students enroll. Both the number and percentage of FTEs in distance learning courses continue to increase:STUDENT FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTE) IN DISTANCE LEARNING rce: Board Office Data & Analytics, extracted 2017-12-21. Data reports credit hours attempted and aggregated by course level.STUDENT FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTE) IN DISTANCE LEARNING COURSES- SUS TOTALS al undergraduate student credit hours are divided by 30 to obtain the number of undergraduate FTEs. Total graduate student credit hours are divided by 24 to obtain the numberof graduate FTEs.2Online Education 201711

Student DemographicsAge of StudentStudents who took only online courses were older than students who took both distance learning and classroom (and/or hybrid courses) and those who took no distance learning courses. Older students are more likely to be place-boundworking full-time and/or supporting families, making distance learning an ideal way for them to complete their degrees.SUS - MEAN AGE OF STUDENTSBY DELIVERY METHOD 2016-17- GRADUATE -SUS - MEAN AGE OF STUDENTSBY DELIVERY METHOD 2016-17- UNDERGRADUATE 262525242423222223222221212020Only DL CoursesBoth DL and Classroomand/or Hybrid CoursesOnly DL CoursesNo DL CoursesBoth DL and Classroomand/or Hybrid CoursesNo DL CoursesSOURCE: BOG SUDS tables, extracted 2017-02-10. Note: Unclassified students are not included in this analysis. Headcounts are unduplicated.GenderSixty-five percent (65%) of students who took only distance learning courses were female, while females comprisedjust 56% of the undergraduate student body as a whole. The higher percentage of females enrolled in only distancelearning courses is consistent with national data that show that females are more likely to be caregivers, which leavesthem placebound. Distance learning courses provide an opportunity for those who are placebound with family or jobresponsibilities to obtain an education.ALL UNDERGRADUATES70%60%50%40%30%20%10%0%Only DL CoursesFemaleMaleBoth DL and Classroom and/orHybrid CoursesFemaleNo DL CoursesMaleSOURCE: BOG staff analysis, Person Demo, Financial Aid Demo, Enrollments, Courses Taken and Instructional Activity data. NOTE: Undergraduate is defined as Student ClassLevel Lower or Upper Division, excluding unclassified students.Online Education 201712

Race/EthnicityThe race/ethnicity of undergraduates who took only distance learning courses closely aligned with that of the undergraduatestudent body as Alla whole.UndergraduatesStudents Who Took Both DL Courses andHybrid and/or Classroom CoursesBOTH DL COURSES AND HYBRID AND/ORCLASSROOM COURSESAmerican Indian orALL UNDERGRADUATESAmerican Indian orAlaskaNative Indian American AmericanAlaskaNativeIndianor Alaska NativeAsianor Alaska NativeAsianAsianAsianBlack or AfricanBlack or African AmericanAmericanBlackor orAfricanBlackAfrican anic/LatinoHispanic/Latino ativeNHawaiianor lande Native Hawaiian or OtherNativeHawaiianorPacificIslanderOther Pacific IslandeNonresidentalien alienNonresidentNonresidentalienNonresidentalien Raceand EthnicityRaceand ethnicityUnknownunknown Race and EthnicityRaceand ethnicityUnknownunknownTwoTwoor moreraces racesor moreTwo or more racesTwo or more racesWhiteWhiteWhiteWhiteStudents Who Took Only DL CoursesStudents Who Took No DL CoursesONLY DL COURSESNO DL COURSESAmerican Indian or AmericanAlaskaNative IndianAmericanIndianor AmericanIndianAlaska NativeAsianAsianBlack or AfricanBlack or African AmericanAmericanBlackor AfricanBlackor African AmericanAmericanor Alaska Nativeor Alaska anic/LatinoHispanic/Latino Native Hawaiian or Other Native Hawaiian or OtherNative Hawaiian orPacificIslanderOther Pacific Nonresidentalien alien Race and Ethnicity ace and EthnicityRRaceand ethnicityUnknownRaceand ethnicityUnknownunknownunknownTwo or more racesTwoor moreTwoor moreracesracesTwo or more racesWhiteWhiteWhiteWhiteSOURCE: BOG staff analysis, Person Demo, Financial Aid Demo, Enrollments, Courses Taken and Instructional Activity data. NOTE: Undergraduate is defined as Student ClassLevel Lower or Upper Division, excluding unclassified students. Fall 2016-17 data.ResidencyOf undergraduate students who took only distance learning courses, 96% were Florida residents; of the total undergraduatepopulation, 93% were Florida residents. These percentages were the same as in 2015-16.RESIDENCYUNDERGRADUATESWHO ONLY TOOK DLCOURSESUNDERGRADUATESWHO TOOK BOTH DLCOURSES AND HYBRIDAND/OR CLASSROOMCOURSESUNDERGRADUATESWHO TOOK NO 8,9998%20,1247%SOURCE: BOG staff analysis, Person Demo, Financial Aid Demo, Enrollments, Courses Taken and Instructional Activity data.NOTE: Undergraduate is defined as Student Class Level Lower or Upper Division, excluding unclassified students. Fall 2015-16 dataOnline Education 201713

Student ServicesFlorida Virtual CampusWork University Challenge, the 6,674 first-time-in-collegestudents attending orientation were asked to complete theassessment and participate in interpretation sessions thathelp define career pathways. MyCareerShines will continueIn 2016-17, Florida Shines (https://www.floridashines.org/)continued to be a ‘student hub for innovative educationalservices’ for students in Florida. It is intended as a one-stopfor students K-20 seeking three major areas of supportthat are legislatively identified as part of the Florida VirtualCampus/Complete Florida Plus Program: college preparation materials,to be a resource for all UCF students, wherever they maybe.Open EducationalResources/eTextbooksTextbook costs in some courses continue to place a burdenon students in Florida’s higher education system. The 2016 resources to support success while in college, andFlorida Student Textbook Survey (Florida Virtual Campus) connection to careersreported that 53.2% of students spent more than 300 onMaterials and resources include information about BrightFutures, scholarships in Florida, financial aid information,how to apply to college, library resources, the online coursecatalog, free online textbooks, transient applications andtextbooks during the spring 2016 term and 17.9% spentmore than 500. The survey also noted that 77.2% ofrespondents spent up to 200 on required course materials.The rising cost of materials seems to be a barrier toMy Career Shines.successful degree completion. The survey found that, dueMyCareerShinesbuy a required textbook; 47.6% occasionally or frequentlyto the cost of required materials, 66.6% of students did nottook fewer courses; 26.1% dropped a course; and 20.7%withdrew from a course. The Florida Virtual Campus plansto update its Florida Student Textbook Survey during theMyCareerShines is a career education and training tool to2017-18 academic year.support K-20 students and Florida job-seekers as they buildThe 2025 Strategic Plan for Online Education recognizedpathways to careers. As described on the FloridaShinesthe high cost of materials by including Affordability Strategyweb site (https://www.floridashines.org/find-a-career),2.1, “Develop a statewide model for the use of eTextbooksMyCareerShines helps students and adults connect theirand other open educational resources to reduce costs forinterests with careers, make a plan for education, andstudents in Florida.” The Steering Committee approvedprepare for work. The site includes tips and videos tothe creation of an Open Educational Resources/eTextimprove job interviewing skills, including what to wear andCommittee to address tactics related to this Strategy.how to prepare for interviews, as well as workforce dataabout jobs and salaries. By June 2017, MyCareerShineshad registered 400,000 users, most of them in middleand high school. In the SUS, UCF is leading universityparticipation in MyCareerShines and expanded its use in2017. In response to Governor Rick Scott’s Ready, Set,Online Education 201714

In March 2017, the Board of Governors Innovation and Online Committee and the full Board approved the OER Committee’srecommendations for increasing faculty and student usage of e-Textbooks and Open Educational Resources (OER). Onbehalf of the SUS, the University of South Florida (USF) will be the lead university and will work with other institutions in theSUS to identify best practices, assessment protocols, creating and adoption of OER content, increasing faculty awareness,and developing faculty incentives. Also crucial to success is coordination of the implementation and usage of a state-levelOER/eText catalog tool and an OER repository tool.To fully implement a process to achieve the goals stated, a Legislative Budget Request (LBR) was prepared forconsideration by the Board for inclusion in its System LBR for 2018-19.IMPACT OF TEXTBOOK COSTS ON STUDENT PROGRESSThe high cost of textbooks is negatively impactingIMPACT OF TEXTBOOKCOSTS ONacademicSTUDENT PROGRESSstudents’progress.The high cost of textbooks is negatively impacting students’ academic progress.How are they 20067%48%46%26%21%Don’t buyrequired booksTake fewercoursesDon’t registerfor a courseDrop courseWithdrawfrom courseHow are these choicesimpacting their learning?38%Are all required books used atsome point in an academic career?20%Earn a poor gradeMoneyrequiredtextbooksStudentWasted2.6average numberpurchased but NEVER usedFail a course* More than one answer may apply.SOURCE: 2016 Student Textbook and Course Materials Survey Results and Findings. To view the full report, visit www.dlss.vc.org.Who spends moreon books andmaterials, collegeor universitystudents?Online Education 00ON TEXTBOOKSSPENTOVER SPENT300OVER ON ADDITIONALMATERIALS15

TutoringDuring 2017-18, the Infrastructure Workgroup willMany state universities offer tutoring through their ownthe proctoring network by utilizing

Online Education 2017 4 The State University System 2017 Annual Report for Online Education provides a comprehensive review of online education in the System. The Annual Report is a companion document to the State University System 2025 Strategic Plan for Online Education, which was adopted by the Board of Governors in Novem