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Operational Planningfor Animal PestOperationsStandard Operating ProcedureThis document has been written for Department of Conservation (DOC)staff. As a result, it includes DOC-specific terms and makes reference tointernal documents that are only accessible to DOC staff. It is being madeavailable to external groups and organisations to demonstrate departmentalbest practice. As these procedures have been prepared for the use of DOCstaff, other users may require authorisation or caveats may apply. Any useby members of the public is at their own risk and DOC disclaims all liabilityin reference to any risk. For further information, please [email protected] SOP was last reviewed on 15/03/2021SOP coordinator: Technical Advisor, ThreatsSOP owner: Threats ManagerUNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532

Table of ContentsPurpose and scope . 4Process . 4Accountability . 5Standards . 5Terminology and definitions . 6The Animal Pest Framework . 7Preparing phase . 8Preparing phase step 1: Know the site . 9Preparing phase step 2: Define the ecological problem. 11Preparing phase step 3: Understand the target pest(s) . 12Preparing phase step 4: Define scope, outcome, and result targets . 13Preparing phase step 5: Design the control. 14Preparing phase step 6: Shortlist possible control method(s) from best practice . 15Preparing phase step 7: Assess possible pesticide uses and trap systems on the StatusLists . 16Preparing phase step 8: Decide what consultation is appropriate . 19Preparing phase step 9: Consult on possible control method(s) . 22Preparing phase step 10: Decide on proposed control method(s) . 24Planning phase. 25Planning phase step 1: Enter operational details in DOCgis Pesticides Application . 26Planning phase step 2: Plan outcome and result monitoring . 28Planning phase step 3: Work out which consents you need . 29Planning phase step 4: Plan operational details and arrange review . 30Planning phase step 5: Prepare draft DOC application form, including map. 32Planning phase step 6: Consult on effects and obtain landowner consent . 35Pre-operational phase . 39Pre-operational phase step 1: Revise all planning documents to respond to consultationand peer review . 40Pre-operational phase step 2: Obtain consents and update operational plan . 42Pre-operational phase step 3: Notify target audience of planned operation . 44Pre-operational phase step 4: Write task specifications and collate attachments . 48Pre-operational phase step 5: Organise contracts. 49Pre-operational phase step 6: Prepare warning signs . 50Pre-operational phase step 7: Check that you are ready for the operational phase . 52UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-14885322

Operational phase . 54Operational phase step 1: Brief operators before field work . 55Operational phase step 2: Undertake pre-control monitoring. 57Operational phase step 3: Communicate the twenty-four hour notice. 58Operational phase step 4: Install warning signs and update DOCgis PesticidesApplication . 60Operational phase step 5: Undertake pest control and update DOCgis PesticidesApplication . 61Post-operational phase. 63Post-operational phase step 1: Send the post-operational update . 64Post-operational phase step 2: Monitor baits and/or carcasses. 66Post-operational phase step 3: Maintain and remove warning signs . 69Post-operational phase step 4: Undertake post-control monitoring . 71Post-operational phase step 5: Debrief operation. 72Reporting phase . 73Reporting phase step 1: Write the Pestlink report and have it verified . 74Reporting phase step 2: Follow up on lessons and recommendations . 77Complete list of resources . 79About this document . 82UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-14885323

Purpose and scopeThe purpose of this SOP is to support effective planning of animal pest operations forconservation. Proper planning helps to achieve the project's desired conservationoutcomes.This SOP applies to all DOC animal pest operations: Using pesticides (including broad scale use of insecticides 1), trapping, and huntingtechniques Carried out by DOC staff, contractors to DOC, or DOC volunteers on behalf of theDepartment On land managed by DOC or on private landThis SOP does not apply to: Animal pest operations carried out by community groups, unless applied through aformal agreement with DOC (refer to Applying for DOC permission to use pesticidesor traps on land managed by DOC docdm-1471353) Animal pest operations carried out by other external organisations or individuals(refer to Applying for DOC permission to use pesticides or traps on land managed byDOC docdm-1471353) Possum fur or skin recovery operators (refer to Cyanide use for possum skin or furrecovery docdm-1553544) Use of pesticides for rodent or insect control in and around huts, buildings andnurseries (refer to the product label directions, HSNO controls and Health and Safetyat Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2017 for the legal requirements) Destruction of individual wasp nests or individual ant nestsProcessDOC animal pest operations are planned and managed by following the Animal PestsFramework, as set out in this SOP. The role of managing this process is called theoperational planner and is subject to qualifications stated in the Key roles in animal pestsoperational planning docdm-1562274. Other steps of the framework also require input fromstaff independent of planning the operation. Consider who will be asked to fulfil these rolesat the start of your operational planning process.Some steps do not apply to all animal pest operations (e.g. some steps only apply whereproposed methods include pesticides). Refer to the “Applies” field at the top of each step toidentify which steps apply to your operation.The process is not strictly linear and in some cases, all the steps in a phase may not becomplete before some of the steps in the next phase need to be actioned.Broad scale use of insecticides means that the method is being applied to achieve sustained controlor eradication of an animal pest at a scale that achieves biodiversity or biosecurity protection.1UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-14885324

AccountabilityManagers are authorised to approve a variation from SOP standards and are accountablefor those decisions. They are required to use their professional judgement and seek adviceor escalate when in doubt. All decisions should be documented. It is expected that variationsfrom standards will be the exception rather than the norm, and that legal (i.e. legislation andjudge-made laws), and health and safety standards are compulsory. Common sense shouldprevail in the case of exceptional or emergency field situations.Once assigned a task by their manager, the user of an SOP is accountable for following thestandards (mandatory tasks) contained in the relevant SOP – not their manager, not theOperations Manager, nor any other staff member. If you wish to vary from a requirementyou must get authorisation to do so from a Manager or higher. The person authorising thevariation is accountable for that decision and must document it, the user is accountable forcarrying it out.StandardsStandards are stated within the steps of the Animal Pests Framework. They are presented intable with the rows alternatively shaded. These standards must be met for DOC animal pestoperations and form the basis for operational readiness checks and audits.1 Standards are presented like this.2 Standards are presented like this.The standards meet requirements under various legislation, including the: Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2017 Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997 Resource Management Act 1991Contractors are accountable for meeting all standards for operations where these tasks areincluded in the contract.A list of all standards from this SOP can be found on the Compliance register docdm1475273 which is used to carry out operational audits (step 5 of the Operational phase of theAnimal Pests Framework). This list is also intended to be used for a readiness check (step 7of the Pre-Operational phase of the Animal Pests Framework) to ensure that everything is inplace to start the fieldwork.Some steps do not have standards. These steps are recommended for DOC animal pestoperations but are not compulsory. In lieu of standards, these steps include points to checkthat the step has been completed fully.UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-14885325

Standards/requirements of other SOPs and systems (e.g. Health and Safety ManagementSystems Manual) are not repeated in this SOP.Terminology and definitionsRefer to Animal Pests SOP Definitions and FAQs docdm-51708 for a complete definition list.UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-14885326

The Animal Pest FrameworkThis framework outlines the process to follow for DOC animal pest operations. Click on thehyperlinks in the bookmark pane on the left side of your screen or the steps in the diagrambelow to see the detail for each individual step.Start point: A site and outcomes have been identified for management.The prescription for your site includes animal pest management.Preparing phase1. Know the site2. Define ecological problem3. Understand target pest(s)4. Define scope, outcome,and result targets5. Design the control6. Shortlist possible controlmethods from best practice7. Assess possible pesticideuses and trap systems onStatus ListsPlanning phase1. Enter operational details inDOCgis Pesticide Application2. Plan outcome and resultmonitoring3. Work out which consentsyou need4. Plan operational detailsand arrange review5. Prepare draft DOCapplication form, includingmap6. Consult on effects andobtain landowner consents8. Decide what consultationis appropriate9. Consult on possible controlmethod(s)10. Decide on proposedcontrol method(s)1. Write the Pestlink reportand have it verified2. Follow up on lessons andrecommendations1. Revise all planningdocuments to respond toconsultation and peer review2. Obtain consents andupdate operational plan3. Notify target audiences ofplanned operation4. Write task specificationsand collate attachments5. Organise contracts6. Prepare warning signs7. Check that you are readyfor the operational phaseOperational phasePost-operational phase1. Send the post-operationalupdate2. Monitor baits and/orcarcassesReporting phasePre-operational phase3. Maintain and removewarning signs4. Undertake post controlmonitoring5. Debrief operationUNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-14885321. Brief operators before thefield work2. Undertake pre-controlmonitoring3. Communicate the twentyfour hour notice4. Install warning signs andupdate DOCgis PesticidesApplication5. Undertake pest control andupdate DOCgis PesticidesApplication7

Preparing phaseThe Preparing phase is the start point of the Animal Pest Framework. You have a site andoutcomes identified for management, and the prescription for your site includes animal pestmanagement.Work through the steps in the Preparing phase to make the key decisions about what youare going to do. Steps 4 and 5 are where you make these decisions that determine thewhole direction of the project. Steps 1 to 3 are where you gather the information needed tomake these decisions.At the end of the Preparing phase you will have a proposed pest control method.Preparing phase1. Know the site2. Define ecological problem3. Understand target pest(s)4. Define scope, outcome,and result targets5. Design the control6. Shortlist possible controlmethods from best practice7. Assess possible pesticideuses and trap systems onStatus Lists8. Decide what consultationis appropriate9. Consult on possible controlmethod(s)10. Decide on proposedcontrol method(s)UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase8

Preparing phase step 1: Know the siteExpect thisto take:Objectives:1 – 5 daysApplies: All operations To know all the background about the site that affects managementdecisions and to make it available to those peer reviewing the plan. To start your operational plan, where control design, logistics and projectmanagement will be recorded.Process:Step 1Write down what you know about the site and gather information sources.Step 2Read and make notes for the site description. Identify any gaps to fill.Step 3Visit site and talk to people.Step 4Create an operational plan and complete the site description. The level of detail foryour site description corresponds to the size, complexity and level of public interestin your operation. In the business planning system, add a link to your operationalplan from your prescription by selecting the Approach tab and then clicking theGeneral Approach section. Type in the docCM number and a comment.Deliverable:Your operational plan with the site description completed.Standards:1 It is compulsory to have an operational plan for all DOC animal pest controloperations. All vertebrate pesticide operations must use the best practice operationalplan template as a minimum. Other operations may use another format.2 The operational plan is written to:– Cover the information required by the prompts in the template– Be specific and factual– Align with definitions– Use concise plain English3 Site-led operations for animal pest control are grouped into one operational plan onlyif all treatment blocks:– Are adjacent (i.e. are at the same location); and/or– Have the same control method(s) across all blocks (even if they are atdifferent locationsPest-led operations can be included in one operational plan for a single Region.4 The operational plan includes a site description that covers values, threats, issuesand other management at the site.UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase9

Resources: Your operational plan, created using the best practice operational plan template docdm1475373 or one of the operational plan examples:– Operational plan aerial 1080 example DOC-5488902– Operational plan bait stations example DOC-5916783– Operational plan DOC200 stoat trapping example DOC-5949271– Operational plan goat hunting example DOC-5918086Key roles in animal pests operational planning docdm-1562274Visit the site yourselfThe prescription for your site in the Business planning systemBioweb for inventory dataThe Conservancy management strategy applicable to your operationMonitoring or survey reportsPeople who have lived, worked or hunted in the areaHistorical accounts of the areaMaps (topographical, geological, vegetation, soil)Information Services agement-andlibrary/ (for publications or films relating to the site) Pestlink reports or office file on management history and past recommendations Previous operational plans Information on sites and outcomes UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase10

Preparing phase step 2: Define the ecological problemExpect thisto take:Objective: 1 hourApplies:All operations To develop a complete picture of the problem (i.e. all the pressures on thebiodiversity assets you want to protect and how they interact) to give areality check on the outcome for the project.Process:Step 1Look at the outcomes agreed for this site at the start point.Step 2Identify the assets (from Preparing phase step 1) that you want to protect.Step 3Identify the threats to those assets.Step 4Draw the connections in a simple “food” web.Step 5Summarise this in an ecological problem statement.Deliverable:‘Food’ web and ecological problem statement.You will have completed this step when: You know what you are trying to achieve (biodiversity or otherwise) You have a ‘food’ web that shows:– The biodiversity assets you want to protect– The biodiversity threats affecting the assets at the site You have updated the Species and Pressures tabs in your prescriptionResources: The prescription for your site in the Business planning system (Species and Pressurestabs) Involve DOC science and technical advisors (e.g. from Who’s Who in Animal Pestsdocdm-98043) Relevant threatened species recovery plans The Conservancy management strategy applicable to your operation Information Services agement-andlibrary/ for relevant publications (e.g. Ramsay and Veltman 2005, Tompkins and Veltman2006, Sinclair and Byrom 2006) Ecological problem statement examples docdm-1552765UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase11

Preparing phase step 3: Understand the target pest(s)Expect thisto take:Objective:2 hours to 2 daysApplies:All operations To know the strengths, weaknesses and basic ecology of the target pest(s)to enable control methods to be designed correctly.Process:Step 1Find reference information for each target pest species.Step 2Read and discuss. Watch out for information that is out of date or not relevant toyour site (e.g. threats or management history is different).Step 3Gain better understanding of the breeding and behavioural factors that will affectyour project.Deliverable:Notes on the ecology of your target pest(s).You will have completed this step when: You understand the strengths and weaknesses of the target pest(s) You have notes on the ecology of your target pest(s) You have related the information that you have gathered to the population of the targetpest at your siteResources:Handbook of New Zealand Mammals 2nd ed., edited by Carolyn M. King (2005)Pestlink reports for past attempts to control this pest at your site or other sitesNew Zealand Freshwater Fishes, A Natural History and Guide, by M R McDowall (1990)Argentine ants in New Zealand .aspPest detective http://www.pestdetective.org.nz/Information Services agement-andlibrary/ for other publications Talk to specialists, scientists and others with experience of managing this pest (e.g. fromWho’s Who in Animal Pests docdm-98043) Global Invasive Species Database http://www.issg.org/database/welcome UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase12

Preparing phase step 4: Define scope, outcome, and resulttargetsExpect thisto take:Objective: 1 hourApplies:All operations To determine which of the threats identified in Preparing phase step 2 thisproject will influence and thereby identify the target pest(s) and outcomeand results targets.Process:Step 1Look at the players in your food web.Step 2Identify which interactions are critical to your outcome. Decide on the long termtimeframe for achieving the outcome.Step 3Decide scope, (i.e. which pests will be managed by this project). Identifyexclusions and linkages to other work.Step 4Define the logical outcome target to measure.Step 5Define the result target needed to achieve this.Deliverable:Scope and targets completed in your operational plan.Standards:1 The operational plan states which pests will be managed and includes the scope,outcome target and result target for this operation.Resources:Your operational planYour ‘food’ web from Preparing phase step 2Writing SMART targets docdm-340202Information Services agement-andlibrary/ for publications on pest density/ native response relationships Relevant threatened species recovery plans Past operational and monitoring reports Talk with specialists, scientists and others with experience of managing these assets UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase13

Preparing phase step 5: Design the controlExpect thisto take:Objective:1-2 daysApplies:All operations Design the timing, scale and frequency of control to meet your outcometarget. This step focuses on the big picture of achieving the outcome,potentially over the course of several operations.Process:Step 1Gather information from previous steps:– Preparing phase step 1: Current pest density– Preparing phase step 2: Vulnerability of biodiversity asset to target pest– Preparing phase step 3: Ecology of target pest– Preparing phase step 4: Outcome and result targetsStep 2Design the control:– How big? i.e. scale of control needed– When? i.e. time of year– How often? i.e. the planned frequency of control into the futureStep 3Review the scale and frequency needed to achieve the outcome target, comparedto what is specified in the prescription. Where this is much larger or more frequentthan stated in the prescription, discuss this with your manager.Deliverable:Control design completed in your operational plan.Standards:1 The operational plan includes a control design which:– Describes the scale of control needed– Identifies the time of year control would have most effect– Predicts the planned frequency of control into the future to achieve andsustain the outcomeResources: Your operational plan The prescription for your site (Activities and Costs/Recurrence tabs) The information from work already done in previous steps of the Preparing phase, i.e.:– Site description (in your operational plan)– ‘Food’ web and ecological problem statement– Notes on the ecology of your target pest(s)– Scope and targets (in your operational plan) Information Services for relevant publications Talk with specialists, scientists and others with experience of managing this pest (e.g.from Who’s Who in Animal Pests docdm-98043)UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase14

Preparing phase step 6: Shortlistmethod(s) from best practiceExpect thisto take:Objective: 1 hourApplies:possiblecontrolAll operations To shortlist control methods that are technically viable for the outcome andresult targets set for the site. Community views and other constraints willbe considered in subsequent steps to identify the proposed controlmethod(s).Process:Step 1Select target pest(s) in the ‘Choose your control method’ part of Current AgreedBest Practice.Step 2Work through best practice levels to decide which are technically viable. Considerpast control methods used at this site.Step 3Select possible control methods.Deliverable:Shortlist of possible control methods.You will have completed this step when: You have eliminated control methods that are not suited to one or more of the following:– Your site– Your ecological problem– Your outcome and result targets– The scale and timing of the operationResources: For pests not covered by the Current Agreed Best Practice:– Review Pestlink reports– Talk with specialists and others with experience managing this pest– Consult other publications Choose your control method from Current agreed best practice for animal pest control Pest management history from Preparing phase step 1 DOC Pesticide Information Reviews docdm-25413UNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase15

Preparing phase step 7: Assess possible pesticide usesand trap systems on the Status ListsExpect thisto take: 1 hourApplies:Objective: To shortlist any pesticide or trap control methods, using the DOC StatusLists to eliminate any which are not accepted for DOC use and to identifyany performance standards you cannot meet.When possible methodsinclude pesticides or trapsProcess: (if only traps are being proposed, start at step 5)Step 1Define your pesticide use(s). A pesticide use refers to a specific techniqueinvolving one pesticide, its toxic loading, bait type, and application method.Examples of pesticide uses include:– aerial application of cereal pellets containing 1.5 g/kg 1080– 8g/kg cholecalciferol hard paste in bait bagsStep 2Find your pesticide use(s) on the Status List docdm-22655. Use the filter functionto find the pesticide, toxic loading, bait type and application methods of interest.If the pesticide use is not on the Status List, stop and evaluate another pesticideuse or seek technical advice.Step 3Find out the status of your pesticide use and target pest, it will fall into one of threecategories: Accepted, Prohibited or Not assessed.Accepted means that the pesticide use can be used in DOC pest operations andin pest operations carried out by other organisations on land managed by DOC.Prohibited means that the pesticide use is prohibited in DOC pest operations andin pest operations carried out by other organisations on land managed by DOC.Decide whether to:– Stop and evaluate another pesticide use; or– Take part in research to fill information needs—review the PesticidesAdvisory Group (PAG) risk assessment and seek technical advice ifconsidering this optionNot assessed means that the pesticide use is registered in New Zealand and istherefore on the Status List, but its risks have not been assessed for use by PAG.It cannot be used until its risks have been assessed. Decide whether to:– Stop and evaluate another pesticide use; or– Seek technical advice to see if the pesticide use can be assessed by thePesticides Advisory GroupUNCLASSIFIEDOperational planning for animal pest operations - DOCDM-1488532Preparing phase16

Step 4Work through the DOC Performance standards sheets for the proposed pesticideuse. The compulsory aspects on the Performance standards sheet are:– Product label requirements– Controlled Substances Licence (CSL), if applicable– Compulsory performance standards– Compulsory information needsThere are two types of compulsory information needs on the Performancestandards sheets: field trials or monitoring. If there are compulsory field trials,follow the Field Trials for Pest Operations SOP docdm-51573. For compulsorymonitoring, you are required to be involved in the data collection and follow anyrelevant monitoring protocols (Inventory and Monitoring Toolbox).If there is anything compulsory you cannot meet, you need to stop and evaluateanother pesticide use.Step 5Define your trap system(s)A trap system refers to a specific technique involving one trap type/model and howit is set (this includes additional equipment such as covers). Examples of trapsystems include:– DOC 200 in tunnel, double or single set– No.1 double coil spring leghold unpadded, ground set/raised set.Step 6Find your trap system(s) on the Trap Status List doc-5620413. Use the filterfunction to find the trap, systems, and target pest of interest.If the trap system is not on the Status List, stop and evaluate another trap systemor seek technical advice.Step 7Find out the status of your trap system and target pest, it will fall into one of threecategories: Accepted, Prohibited or Not assessed.Accepted means that the trap system can be used in DOC pest operations and inpest operations carried out by othe

This document has been written for Department of Conservation (DOC) staff. As a result, it includes DOC-specific terms and makes reference to internal documents that are only accessible to DOC staff. It is being made available to external groups and